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#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
    char greeting[]="\nHello World!\n";
    int a;

    for(int i=0; i<strlen(greeting); i++)
        greeting[i]^=111;

    for(int i=0; i<strlen(greeting); i++)
        greeting[i]^=111;

    printf("%s\n",greeting);    
    scanf("%d",&a);

}

Output:

Hell

Why does it cut everything after spotting a letter corresponding to the XOR key's number (in this case, ASCII 'w')? In mathematical logic, N^N=0 and 0^N=N, doesn't it?

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1  
DEMO –  qwertymk May 1 '12 at 0:35
    
This is supposed to be simple XOR encryption, right? –  Linuxios May 1 '12 at 0:52
2  
Is this a quiz or a real problem you have? I don't think this site is the place for quizzes. –  ugoren May 1 '12 at 7:06
5  
Note that you've got a Shlemiel the painter's algorithm in there, which is a pretty strong code smell. As it happens, fixing that will fix the truncation bug as well. –  Daniel Pryden May 1 '12 at 23:30
1  
@DanielPryden +1 for an observation more important than the analysis of the cause of the XOR-induced premature termination. I am sick & tired of seeing people write for-loops with unnecessary function calls in their termination condition. I've seen loops that should take microseconds to complete take multiple milliseconds due to things like this. –  phonetagger May 4 '12 at 14:29
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3 Answers

up vote 56 down vote accepted

Because 'o' is ASCII code 111, and XORing 111 with 111 yields 0, NUL, and terminates your string. Once this happens (even in the first loop, since you're evaluating it each time through the loop), strlen reports the string is much shorter, and the loops stop.

Saving the string length before going through the XORs will save you from this.

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6  
Note that to fix this, he should save the return value of strlen before he mutates the string. –  Seth Carnegie May 1 '12 at 0:38
3  
@NicolBolas He mutates it and then unmutates it and after that the original string is obtained, so proof: ideone.com/omgw0 –  Seth Carnegie May 1 '12 at 0:42
3  
+1. Note that the xoring affect the first loop too - it doesn't go after the 'o'. –  asaelr May 1 '12 at 0:42
    
Incorporated comments. Thanks! (I didn't think about the first loop initially.) –  zigg May 1 '12 at 0:50
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This is because when you xor a number with itself, it becomes zero, and when strlen sees zero, it thinks it's the end of the string.

If you store the length in a variable before the first loop and then use that saved length in your second loop instead of strlen, your program will produce the expected result.

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greeting[5] is 'o' which is 111 in ASCII. Hence greeting[5] ^ 111 will be zero (which will terminate your string) The strlen in the second loop will return a different value.

To fix this, use a variable len to store the original strlen. You will get your string back !!!

Modified:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
    char greeting[]="\nHello World!\n";
    int a;
    int len = strlen(greeting);

    for(int i=0; i<len; i++)
        greeting[i]^=111;

    for(int i=0; i<len; i++)
        greeting[i]^=111;

    printf("%s\n",greeting);    
    scanf("%d",&a);

}
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