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<?php
$bigArray = array(
    array('John','2012-03-29',1),
    array('Doe','2012-03-30',1),
    array('John','2012-03-31',2),
    array('Doe','2012-03-31',5),
    array('Tom','2012-03-31',5),
    array('John','2012-04-02',5),
    array('John','2012-04-02',21),
    array('John','2012-03-07',21)
);

$cache = array();
foreach ($bigArray as $v) {
    if (isset($cache[$v[1]])) {
        if ($cache[$v[1][1]] == $v[2]) {
            echo "Equal";
            $cache[$v[1]] = array($v[0].','.$cache[$v[1]][0], $v[2]);//append user to same value
        }
        else if ($cache[$v[1][1]] < $v[2]) {
            echo "Replacing value! ".$cache[$v[1]][0]. " to " .$v[0]."<br/>";
            $cache[$v[1]] = array($v[0], $v[2]);
        }
    } else {
        $cache[$v[1]] = array($v[0], $v[2]);
    }
}

print_r($cache);
?>

This script finds the highest value for a particular date and saves it to a new array $cache

However when checking if the highest value is equal on the same date, it returns false?

array(
    array('Doe','2012-03-31',5),
    array('Tom','2012-03-31',5),
)

The above in the array is what is confusing me. Shouldn't it be counted as a match?

The output:

Replacing value! John to Doe
Replacing value! Doe to Tom
Replacing value! John to John
Array
(
    [2012-03-29] => Array
    (
        [0] => John
        [1] => 1
    )
    [2012-03-30] => Array
        (
        [0] => Doe
        [1] => 1
    )
    [2012-03-31] => Array
    (
        [0] => Tom
        [1] => 5
    )
    [2012-04-02] => Array
    (
        [0] => John
        [1] => 21
    )
    [2012-03-07] => Array
    (
        [0] => John
        [1] => 21
    )
)
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Without going into too much detail, $v[1][1] seems to be quite nonsensical to me. It refers to the second character of the date string in your original array. You probably mean:

$cache[$v[1]][1]
share|improve this answer
    
+1, was 1min too late :) –  Jack May 1 '12 at 2:27
    
Wow I can't believe I didn't see that. Thank you so much! –  user521903 May 1 '12 at 2:37
1  
And this is why working with associative arrays with explicitly named keys makes things a lot easier... :) –  deceze May 1 '12 at 2:40

I'm going to guess here, but maybe instead of:

$cache[$v[1][1]]

You should write:

$cache[$v[1]][1]

Slight difference in the braces :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much! –  user521903 May 1 '12 at 2:37

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