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I am trying to measure CPU time using following code.

timespec time1, time2, temp_time;

clock_gettime(CLOCK_PROCESS_CPUTIME_ID, &time1);
 int i;
 int cpu_sum = 0;


 for (i = 0; i < nelements; i++) {

  cpu_sum += array[i];

 }    
clock_gettime(CLOCK_PROCESS_CPUTIME_ID, &time2);
temp_time.tv_sec = time2.tv_sec - time1.tv_sec;
printf( sum: %d using CPU in %lf ms \n",cpu_sum, temp_time.tv_sec);

But I always get time as 0.000ms Any idea what is wrong here.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
You're not checking the clock_gettime(3) calls for error returns; check the return value and use perror(3) to output an error message if an error was returned. –  sarnold May 1 '12 at 3:24
    
clock_gettime should never return an error when given valid arguments. –  R.. May 1 '12 at 3:24
    
@R..: Not all clocks are available on all platforms; user958263 didn't show the sysconf(3) code to verify that the clocks he is using are available on his platform, so I'm curious if it has failed because they aren't supported. –  sarnold May 1 '12 at 3:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  1. You're invoking undefined behavior by passing the wrong argument types to printf (time_t, which is probably long, instead of double).

  2. tv_sec just contains the whole seconds part of the time. You need to also use tv_nsec to get the nanoseconds part.

Try something like:

temp_time.tv_sec = time2.tv_sec - time1.tv_sec;
temp_time.tv_nsec = time2.tv_nsec - time2.tv_nsec;
if (temp_time.tv_nsec < 0) {
    temp_time.tv_nsec += 1000000000;
    temp_time.tv_sec--;
}
printf("%lld.%.9ld\n", (long long)temp_time.tv_sec, (long)temp_time.tv_nsec);
share|improve this answer
    
I tried this code but still time is always zero –  mundella May 1 '12 at 3:38
    
time_t could be an integer or floating type, POSIX allows either. –  dreamlax May 1 '12 at 4:20
    
It could be, but in practice it never is. Even if it were, when used in timespec, it would still only store whole numbers. –  R.. May 1 '12 at 4:26
    
@dreamlax: FYI, POSIX 2008 requires it to be an integer type. –  R.. Oct 11 '13 at 3:54
    
@R..: That's good to know. I have never encountered a system that uses a floating time_t but every time I use the time_t type I always consider the possibility. Going forward this is going to be much less of an issue! –  dreamlax Oct 11 '13 at 4:19

The above won't compile as-is but there is one obvious problem: you're only looking at the tv_sec fields and not the tv_nsec fields. The two tv_sec values, which measure whole seconds, will likely be identical because much less than one entire second of CPU time will elapse.

To subtract two timespec structure values (untested):

void ts_delta(struct timespec *result, struct timespec *a, struct timespec *b) {
    int borrow = 0;
    long n = a->tv_nsec - b->tv_nsec;

    if (n < 0) { /* nsec underflow; borrow 1 from seconds */
        n += 1000000000L;
        borrow = 1;
    }
    result->tv_nsec = n;
    result->tv_sec = a->tv_sec - b->tv_sec - borrow;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
You missed the printf format mistake. –  R.. May 1 '12 at 3:25
    
@R..: I did! I usually rely on compiling with -W -Wall to catch type errors in C. –  torek May 1 '12 at 3:29
    
And how do i print the time in this case? –  mundella May 1 '12 at 3:42
    
@R..'s answer has a good method for printing the result. Note, I have no idea whether your system can even capture the time taken for a small sum (e.g., if nelements is only a few tens of thousands). –  torek May 1 '12 at 4:13
    
If it's Linux, clock_gettime actually has nanosecond precision on modern systems. For cpu time (which is in some ways easier to measure than real time), it's almost surely that precise. –  R.. May 1 '12 at 4:27

I assume you are trying on Linux.

In my system it prints like the following. You can check and let me know if it works.

ayub@gentux ~ $ cat cputime.c
#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>

int main(void)
{
  struct timespec time1, time2, temp_time;

  clock_gettime(CLOCK_PROCESS_CPUTIME_ID, &time1);
  int i;
  int cpu_sum = 0;
  static int array[1000]; /* 'static' to make the array initialized to zero by default (for demo) */
  int nelements = 1000;
  long diff = 0;

  array[0] = 10;
  for (i = 0; i < nelements; i++) {
    cpu_sum += array[i];
  }    
  clock_gettime(CLOCK_PROCESS_CPUTIME_ID, &time2);
  temp_time.tv_sec = time2.tv_sec - time1.tv_sec;
  temp_time.tv_nsec = time2.tv_nsec - time1.tv_nsec;
  diff = temp_time.tv_sec * 1000000000 + temp_time.tv_nsec; /* total ns */
  printf("Sum: %d using CPU in %lf ms \n", cpu_sum, (double) diff/1000000); /* now we print as milisecond */

  return 0;
}

ayub@gentux ~ $ gcc -o cputime cputime.c -lrt
ayub@gentux ~ $ time ./cputime
Sum: 10 using CPU in 0.003197 ms 

real    0m0.001s
user    0m0.000s
sys     0m0.000s
ayub@gentux ~ $ ./cputime 
Sum: 10 using CPU in 0.002599 ms
share|improve this answer

The gnu libc manual has some good info, and even includes an example subtraction function

http://www.gnu.org/software/libc/manual/html_node/Elapsed-Time.html

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