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Based on Jimmy's Enumeration classes idea I am wanting to see if I can avoid using the constructor to instantiate my type (which I assume is happening with the discriminator-value) but rather use a "factory method"-esque way of getting my instance mapped from the db.

Here is my type:

public class Impact : Enumeration
{
    public static readonly Impact Carbon
        = new Impact(1, "Carbon dioxide equivalent", CommonUnit.CO2e);
    public static readonly Impact Energy
        = new Impact(2, "Energy", CommonUnit.MJ);
    public static readonly Impact Cost
        = new Impact(3, "Cost", CommonUnit.Dollars);



    public Impact(int index, string name, CommonUnit unit)
        : base(index, name)
    {
        this.Unit = unit;
    }


    public CommonUnit Unit { get; private set; }

}

And here is the definition for Enumeration:

public class Enumeration : ValueObject
{
    public Enumeration(int index, string displayName)
    {
        this.Index = index;
        this.DisplayName = displayName;
    }


    public int Index { get; private set; }
    public string DisplayName { get; private set; }


    public override string ToString()
    {
        return this.DisplayName;
    }


    public static IEnumerable<T> GetAllFor<T>() where T : Enumeration
    {
        foreach (var publicStatic in typeof(T).GetFields(BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly))
        {
            Enumeration item = null;
            item = (Enumeration)publicStatic.GetValue(null);
            yield return item as T;
        }
    }

    public static T With<T>(int index) where T : Enumeration
    {
        return GetAllFor<T>().SingleOrDefault(i => i.Index == index);
    }
}

ValueObject simply covers off Equality functionality.

Elsewhere I use the static methods to get items from this enum (kinda like how you could use the core Enumeration static methods):

impact = Impact.With<Impact>(index.ImpactId.Value);

This is pretty handy but I want to know if I can get NHibernate to do this too when rehydrating objects.

Can it be done and how?

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2 Answers 2

With an NHibernate Custom Type:

public class EnumerationType<T> : PrimitiveType where T : Enumeration
{
    public EnumerationType()
        : base(new SqlType(DbType.Int32))
    {
    }

    public override object Get(IDataReader rs, int index)
    {
        object o = rs[index];
        var value = Convert.ToInt32(o);
        return Enumeration.With<T>(value);
    }

    public override object Get(IDataReader rs, string name)
    {
        int ordinal = rs.GetOrdinal(name);
        return Get(rs, ordinal);
    }

    public override Type ReturnedClass
    {
        get { return typeof(T); }
    }

    public override object FromStringValue(string xml)
    {
        return int.Parse(xml);
    }

    public override string Name
    {
        get { return "Enumeration"; }
    }

    public override void Set(IDbCommand cmd, object value, int index)
    {
        var parameter = (IDataParameter)cmd.Parameters[index];

        var val = (Enumeration)value;

        parameter.Value = val.Value;
    }

    public override string ObjectToSQLString(object value, Dialect dialect)
    {
        return value.ToString();
    }

    public override Type PrimitiveClass
    {
        get { return typeof(int); }
    }

    public override object DefaultValue
    {
        get { return 0; }
    }
}

If you're doing an HBM.xml-based mapping, you can set the custom type like this:

<property name="Impact" column="Impact" type="Namespace.To.EnumerationType`1[[Impact, AssemblyWithDomainEnum]], AssemblyWithNHibCustomType"/>

Alternatively, if you're using Fluent NHibernate, you can create a convention to map all enumeration types without having to configure each one individually:

public class EnumerationTypeConvention : IPropertyConvention, IPropertyConventionAcceptance
{
    private static readonly Type _openType = typeof(EnumerationType<>);

    public void Apply(IPropertyInstance instance)
    {
        var closedType = _openType.MakeGenericType(instance.Property.PropertyType);

        instance.CustomType(closedType);
    }

    public void Accept(IAcceptanceCriteria<IPropertyInspector> criteria)
    {
        criteria.Expect(x => typeof(Enumeration).IsAssignableFrom(x.Property.PropertyType));
    }
}

And then add that convention however you like in your Fluent NHibernate configuration.

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I started down the road with IUserType based on some comments I found on your blog. Is this not going to work? It seems your suggestion with PrimitiveType might actually tie into the IUserType at some point as the methods seem similar. –  cottsak May 1 '12 at 12:38
1  
Yes, PrimitiveType just makes custom user types easier –  Jimmy Bogard May 1 '12 at 14:57
    
Can you explain the added value of what's happening in the Fluent mapping please? –  cottsak May 3 '12 at 7:29
    
For others: Jimmy kindly blogged about this in more detail. –  cottsak May 3 '12 at 7:41
    
The fluent mapping convention allows us to not have to specify the custom user type like we had to do with the HBM mapping. With HBM, we have to specify the custom user type for EVERY PROPERTY. With a convention, we only have to specify the custom user type ONCE. –  Jimmy Bogard May 3 '12 at 12:44

This seemed to work too, but perhaps Jimmy's way seems easier:

public class ImpactEnumType : IUserType
{
    public SqlType[] SqlTypes
    {
        get
        {
            //We store our Impact in a single column in the database that can contain a int (for the index value)
            SqlType[] types = new SqlType[1];
            types[0] = new SqlType(DbType.Int32);
            return types;
        }
    }

    public Type ReturnedType
    {
        get { return typeof(Impact); }
    }

    public bool Equals(object x, object y)
    {
        // Impact is derived from ValueObject which implements Equals
        return x.Equals(y);
    }

    public int GetHashCode(object x)
    {
        // as above
        return x.GetHashCode();
    }

    public object NullSafeGet(IDataReader rs, string[] names, object owner)
    {
        //We get the string from the database using the NullSafeGet used to get ints
        int impactIndex = (int)NHibernateUtil.Int32.NullSafeGet(rs, names[0]);

        // then pull the instance from the Enumeration type using the static helpers
        return Impact.With<Impact>(impactIndex);
    }

    public void NullSafeSet(IDbCommand cmd, object value, int index)
    {
        //Set the value using the NullSafeSet implementation for int from NHibernateUtil
        if (value == null)
        {
            NHibernateUtil.Int32.NullSafeSet(cmd, null, index);
            return;
        }
        value = (value as Impact).Index;
        NHibernateUtil.Int32.NullSafeSet(cmd, value, index);
    }

    public object DeepCopy(object value)
    {
        //We deep copy the Impact by creating a new instance with the same contents
        if (value == null) return null;
        return Impact.With<Impact>((value as Impact).Index);
    }

    public bool IsMutable
    {
        get { return false; }
    }

    public object Replace(object original, object target, object owner)
    {
        //As our object is immutable we can just return the original
        return original;
    }

    public object Assemble(object cached, object owner)
    {
        //Used for casching, as our object is immutable we can just return it as is
        return cached;
    }

    public object Disassemble(object value)
    {
        //Used for casching, as our object is immutable we can just return it as is
        return value;
    }
}

My HBM XML:

<property name="Impact" column="ImpactIndex" type="namespace.childnamespace.ImpactEnumType, namespace.childnamespace" />
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