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I have this code:

PageList: function(url, index, classes){
    this.url = url;
    this.index = index;
    ...
};

PageList.prototype.toHTML = function(){
    var div = $('<div class="container"></div>');
    var p = $('<p></p>');
    var link = $('<a></a>');
    $.each(this.elements, function(index, array_value){
          console.log(this.url);
          ...
    }
}

And it worked as expected.

The problem was that console.log(this.url) was printing undefined, so I reworked the code to look like this:

PageList.prototype.toHTML = function(){
    var div = $('<div class="container"></div>');
    var p = $('<p></p>');
    var link = $('<a></a>');
    var instance = this;
    $.each(this.elements, function(index, array_value){
               console.log(instance.url);
        }
}

I know that the problem was on the closure not taking this as the value of the instance, but as far as i know a reference to this inside a function that doesn't have an instance bound to it must refer to the window object, instead of undefined, at least that's the case on many of the browsers out there.

So what exactly is going on on my code.

Note: I'm using jQuery and this.elements is already defined.

Edit: Now im figuring out that $.each is a non-instance function, so my callback is being called from $.each but it must be window the reference to this, still thinking about it.

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4  
Welcome to the world of JavaScript scoping. –  epascarello May 1 '12 at 4:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

According to the jQuery docs for $.each:

The value [of the current element] can also be accessed through the this keyword...

In JavaScript, when you hand off a callback function to a higher-order function (in this case, $.each), the higher-order function can decide what the value of this will be when the callback runs. There is no way for you to control this behavior -- simply don't use this (e.g., by using a reference like instance in your example or via a closure).

Check out the context-setting functions Function.call and Function.apply to understand how a higher-order function like $.each sets the this context of a callback. Once you read those MDN pages, it might clear a few things up.

Here's a quick example:

Array.prototype.forEachWithContext(callback, this_in_callback) {
    for(var i = 0; i < this.length; ++i) {
        callback.call(this_in_callback, i, this[i]);
    }
}

And to use it:

PageList.prototype.toHTML = function(){
    //...
    this.elements.forEachWithCallback(function(index, array_value){ ... }, this);
}

My example Array.forEachWithContext is similar to Array.forEach. However, it takes a callback and a second argument that is used as the value of this during the execution each of those callbacks.

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I know how to use call and apply, just it would be awkward to code some thing like this: $.each.apply(this, ... ); personaly i don't like to mix jquery and js on the same command like this. –  loki May 1 '12 at 5:01
    
You don't need to use my code -- I just wrote it exaplain how jQuery uses call to alter the context of your callback. In this case, $.each is perfectly servicible; just use the code with instance you already have. Since you know call/apply, the main value of my answer is the initial quote from the jQuery docs: within the $.each callback, this is set to the current array element. That's the explanation you wanted, I think. –  apsillers May 1 '12 at 5:03
    
You were right, i watched an "object" on the console and assumed it was refering to the window object. –  loki May 1 '12 at 5:17

Try wrapping your $.each function with a $.proxy like this...

$.each(this.elements, $.proxy(function(index, array_value){
    console.log(this.url);
},this));

The $.proxy will ensure that this references your PageList...

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Vote up for the proxy function, but still don't know what is causing it to behave like that. –  loki May 1 '12 at 4:25

I know that the problem was on the closure not taking this as the value of the instance, but as far as i know a reference to this inside a function that doesn't have an instance bound to it must refer to the window object, instead of undefined, at least that's the case on many of the browsers out there.

this is window. You're printing window.url, which is undefined. Try console.log(this), and it should yield window.

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It's pretty embatassing not to have notice that before. –  loki May 1 '12 at 4:37
    
Wait, is this correct? My intuition (and tests) indicate that this should be equal to the PageList instance while inside of PageList.toHTML and then equal to the current list element while inside the callback to $.each. When do you ever observe it being equal to window in this code, except outside of PageList altogether? –  apsillers May 1 '12 at 4:57
    
I just read @apsillers answer, and he may be right. But what is this.elements on your code? –  bfavaretto May 1 '12 at 4:58
    
it's a plain js array. –  loki May 1 '12 at 5:03
    
So I guess @apsillers is right. I glanced at the docs before answering looking for that, didn't see it and assumed only .each (as opposed to jQuery.each) behaved that way. Anyway, I guess none of the values on the elements array has an url property, thus your undefined value. –  bfavaretto May 1 '12 at 5:06

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