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Suppose we have a class:

template <class Type>
class A
{
public:
    void function1(float a, Type b);
    void function1(float a, float b);
};

Now instantiate the class like this:

A<int> a;

It's fine, this class will have 2 overloaded functions with these parameters: (float a, int b); (float a, float b);

But when you instantiate the class like this:

A<float> a;

You get compile error: member function redeclared. So, depending on the type of Type, I wan't (or don't want) the compiler to define a function, something like this:

template <class Type>
class A
{
public:
    void function1(float a, Type b);

    #if Type != float
    void function1(float a, float b);
    #endif
};

But, ofcourse, the syntax above doesn't work. Is it possible to perform such a task in C++? If possible, please provide an example. Thanks in advance :)

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See this FAQ stackoverflow.com/questions/1501357/… –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 1 '12 at 10:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You could use template specialization:

template <class Type>
class A {
public:
    void function1(float a, Type b) {
    }
    void function1(float a, float b) {
    }
};

template <>
class A<float> {
public:
    void function1(float a, float b) {
    }
};

// ...

A<int> a_int;
a_int.function1(23.4f, 1);
a_int.function1(23.4f, 56.7f);

A<float> a_float;
a_float.function1(23.4f, 56.7f);

--- EDIT ---

If you have a large number of common functions, you could do something like this:

class AImp {
public:
    void function1(float a, float b) {
    }
    void function1(float a, double b) {
    }
    void function1(float a, const std::string& b) {
    }
    // Other functions...
};

template <class Type>
class A : public AImp {
public:
    void function1(float a, Type b) {
    }
    using AImp::function1;
};

template <>
class A<float> : public AImp {
};

// ...

A<int> a_int;
a_int.function1(23.4f, 1);
a_int.function1(23.4f, 56.7f);
a_int.function1(23.4f, 56.7);
a_int.function1(23.4f, "bar");

A<float> a_float;
a_float.function1(23.4f, 56.7f);
a_float.function1(23.4f, 56.7);
a_float.function1(23.4f, "bar");
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If for example, I have 10 functions in a class, and only 2 or 3 need to be specialized, then I have to rewrite all 10 functions in a specialized version? –  Vadim May 1 '12 at 9:47
    
@Vadim Essentially yes, but you don't have to repeat their bodies - you can always place a common implementation in a separate function and then just call it from bodies of both functions (from both specialized and general class). –  Branko Dimitrijevic May 1 '12 at 10:05
    
@Vadim: not necessarily, you could perhaps put the functions that don't need to be specialized into a common base class. Or the functions that do need to be specialized in a template base class. –  Steve Jessop May 1 '12 at 10:20
    
@SteveJessop Yup, I was just writing about that - one only needs to be careful about overloading resolution (using in generic A). –  Branko Dimitrijevic May 1 '12 at 10:22
    
@Vadim Or, you could use inheritance, provided you are aware of the strangeness of the C++ overloading resolution and don't forget using in template <class Type> A - see my edit. –  Branko Dimitrijevic May 1 '12 at 10:24

You can use some C++11 std::enable_if :

template <class Type>
class A
{
public:
    template<typename t = Type, 
       typename std::enable_if<!std::is_same<t, float>::value, int>::type = 0>
    void function1(float a, Type b) {
    }

    void function1(float a, float b) {
    }
};
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You have made a function into a function template, which is a rather drastic change. A function template cannot be virtual, for one. –  n.m. May 1 '12 at 10:21
    
Admittedly I don't know how to do it with a regular (non-templated) member function, or if it's possible at all. –  n.m. May 1 '12 at 10:44
    
@n.m.: it is not possible. The OP did not mention virtual yet, so perhaps it's not a problem. –  Matthieu M. May 1 '12 at 11:09

Use SFINAE:

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

template <typename Type>
struct Foo {
    template <typename T = Type>
    void function1(float a, float b, typename std::enable_if<!std::is_same<T, float>::value>::type *c = 0) {
        std::cout << "float\n";
    }
    void function1(float a, Type b) {
       std::cout << "type\n";
    }
};

int main() {
    Foo<float> f;
    f.function1(1, 1);
    f.function1(1.0f,1.0f);
    Foo<int> g;
    g.function1(1,1);
    g.function1(1.0f,1.0f);
    g.function1(1.0,1.0); // warning!
}

Output:

type
type
type
float
type

You'll need C++11 mode, to allow the default template parameter in a function template. And also to get enable_if and is_same, although you could get enable_if from Boost instead.

The "warning!" is because with your original code g.function1(1.0,1.0); was ambiguous. Now the the non-template overload is preferred. You can make it ambiguous again by doing

    template <typename T = Type>
    void function1(float a, Type b, typename std::enable_if<true>::type *c = 0) {
       std::cout << "type\n";
    }
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