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I have some problems calling a constructor with a hash. I get the error:

"Odd number of elements in hash assignment at Sumcheck.pm line 4". Sumcheck.pm looks like this:

package Sumcheck;

sub new {
    my ($debug, $debug_matches,%checkHash) = @_;
    my $self = {};
    $self->{DEBUG} = $debug;
    $self->{DEBUG_MATCHES} = $debug_matches;
    $self->{CHECKRESULT_OK} = "COMPLIANT"; 
    $self->{CHECKRESULT_ERROR} = "NONCOMPLIANT"; 
    $self->{checkHash} = %checkHash;
    #print %checkHash;

    bless($self);
    return $self;
}
1;

And i call it like this(just a random hash):

use Sumcheck;
$debug = 0;
$debug_matches = 1;

%checkHash = (  'The Shining'       => 'Kubrick',
                'Ten Commandments'  => 'DeMille',
                'Goonies'           => 'Donner',);

$sumCheck = Sumcheck->new($debug, $debug_matches, %checkHash);

Why do i get this error? How it is solved?

Thx :)

share|improve this question
    
Do you mean to store a reference to %checkHash in the object? $self->{checkHash} = %checkHash [sic] likely doesn't do what you want. –  pilcrow May 1 '12 at 12:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The first implicit argument to a method called like this:

MyPackage->someMethod()

is the name of the package. Eg:

package MyPackage;

sub someMethod {
    print shift;

will yield MyPackage.

The idea WRT to constructors is:

sub new {
    my $class = shift;  # now your $debug would be $_[0], so:
    my $self = { @_ };  # <- replace this with your own details
    bless $self, $class;
}

You don't have to do exactly that, but do you see now why your hash has an odd number of elements? In Sumcheck::new, $debug is not what you think it is (check). Remember, a hash is passed literally as a list like this:

name, value, name, value

So, "Sumcheck" (the package name) gets placed in $debug, 0 gets placed into $debug_matches then the first element of the hash is 1, leading to this:

1 => `The Shining`
'Kubrick' => 'Ten Commandments',
'DeMille' => 'Goonies',
'Donner'  =>  # uneven number of elements error

FYI, the first implicit argument to an object method called this way (the second line):

my $obj = Sumcheck->new(..,.);
$obj->someMethod();

Will be $obj, aka. the $self in the method:

sub someMethod {
    my $self = shift

which is the blessed hash returned by the constructor, new().

share|improve this answer
    
hmm yes i see - thx for the good explanation. I also tested it - with the same results :). But i still cant see how you would solve this. –  user1093774 May 1 '12 at 11:39
    
The first thing you do in a package sub is shift off the first implicit argument. For instance methods, that's $self. For a constructor, you treat it as the name of the class (since it was called via Sumcheck->new(), not $obj->new()), which you should use as the second argument to bless. Have a look at my example new(). You just want to replace the $self = { @_ } line with whatever you want -- probably, my ($debug, $debug_matches,%checkHash) = @_; and proceed from there. –  goldilocks May 1 '12 at 11:45
    
thx tried that - it works now :) thx a lot to both goldilocks & Nikhil Jain! –  user1093774 May 1 '12 at 11:59

First of all, always use use strict and use warnings in you program.

The program is not working as you expected, becuase whenever you make a object of the class then first parameter is always the instance of the class, so write it like this way:

package Sumcheck;
use strict;
use warnings;

   sub new {
   # $checkhash variable holds the reference of the hash.
   my ($class, $debug, $debug_matches,$checkHash) = @_; #$class would hold the instance
   my $self = {};
   $self->{DEBUG} = $debug;
   $self->{DEBUG_MATCHES} = $debug_matches;
   $self->{CHECKRESULT_OK} = "COMPLIANT";
   $self->{CHECKRESULT_ERROR} = "NONCOMPLIANT";
   $self->{checkHash} = %{$checkHash};
   #print %checkHash;
   bless($self);
   return $self;
   }
   my %test = ( abc => "30"); # for testing
   # pass hash as reference
   my $sumcheck = Sumcheck->new('test', 'test20', \%test ); 
   print"$sumcheck->{DEBUG}"; # for testing
   1; 

Above code will solve your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
You changed the argument processing from my (..., %h) = @_ to my (..., $h) = @_, which will give the OP a new problem (ignored arguments) in place of the old problem (improper hash assignment). –  pilcrow May 1 '12 at 12:30
    
@pilcrow: I am suggesting the OP to pass the hash refenence instead of hash like my $sumcheck = Sumcheck->new('test', 'test20', \%test );, it will work fine, It would not give any problem like improper hash assignment. –  Nikhil Jain May 1 '12 at 12:42
    
Yes, I know, but you didn't explain that you were changing the method's call parameters and thus breaking the OP's invocation. :) –  pilcrow May 1 '12 at 13:59
    
Added one comment in the code, # $checkhash variable holds the reference of the hash., hope, now it would not breaking the OP's invocation and OP could understand the code. –  Nikhil Jain May 1 '12 at 14:23
    
Isn't it better to use the two-argument version of bless (bless $self,$class;) which would allow the class to be inherited. –  dgw May 1 '12 at 23:27

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