Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

It appears the only way to clear a region from a canvas is to use the clearRect() command - I need to clear a circle (I am masking out areas from a filled canvas, point lights in this specific case) and despite all attempts it does not seem possible.

I tried drawing a circle with an alpha value of 0 but simply nothing would appear unless the alpha was higher (which is counter to the point :P) - I assume because a contex.fill() draws it as an add rather than a replace.

Any suggestions on how I might be able to (quickly) clear circles for mask purposes?

share|improve this question
    
There are two good answers here, but I'd like to see a screenshot of what you want to accomplish just in case there's a more performant and clever way to go accomplishing the same task –  Simon Sarris May 1 '12 at 15:49
    
i've accepted the clip() answer but just to satisfy your curiosity (and maybe you have a better technique!) heres what i'm doing: I render 2D point lights to a buffer. I render that buffer over my game using the Lighten style, it acheives great effect! But I also wanted to darken everything not lit to an ambiant value - this does not draw with Lighten so it needs to be a seperate draw. However rendering a seperate ambiant buffer darkens the lights which I did not want, so i want to "mask out" the lit regions in my ambiant buffer :) –  David Burford May 1 '12 at 17:00
    
Thanks. I've answered with a bit of info that might be useful depending on what you're doing –  Simon Sarris May 1 '12 at 17:34

6 Answers 6

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Use .arc to create a circular stroke and then use .clip() to make that the current clipping region.

Then you can use .clearRect() to erase the whole canvas, but only the clipped area will change.

share|improve this answer
    
would never of managed that on my own - thanks good solution! For clearing all sorts of strange shapes also! –  David Burford May 1 '12 at 16:56
    
Note that many mobile browsers support only rectangular clipping regions. –  Viesturs Feb 24 at 10:17

If you're making a game or something where squeezing every bit of performance matters, have a look at how I made this answer: Canvas - Fill a rectangle in all areas that are fully transparent

Specifically, the edit of the answer that leads to this: http://jsfiddle.net/a2Age/2/

The huge plusses here:

  • No use of paths (slow)
  • No use of clips (slow)
  • No need for save/restore (since there's no way to reset a clipping region without clearing all state(1), it means you must use save/restore also)

(1) I actually complained about this and resetClip() has been put in the offical spec because of it, but it will be a while before browsers implement it.

share|improve this answer
    
hey, some brill code there! I'm not selecting this is my answer because the previous answer directly answers the question I asked (so is more useful to people searching for same thing for other reasons) but your link can be directly applied to what i was doing as probably a better way! I'd vote it up, but I don't have enough stack rep apparantly xD So my heartfelt thanks will have to do :) –  David Burford May 1 '12 at 17:48
    
Good job on getting resetClip() added! –  ellisbben May 3 '12 at 18:24

You have a few options.

Firstly, here's a function we'll use to fill a circle.

var fillCircle = function(x, y, radius)
{
    context.beginPath();
    context.arc(x, y, radius, 0, 2 * Math.PI, false);
    context.fill();
};

clip()

var clearCircle = function(x, y, radius)
{
    context.beginPath();
    context.arc(x, y, radius, 0, 2 * Math.PI, false);
    context.clip();
    context.clearRect(x - radius - 1, y - radius - 1,
                      radius * 2 + 2, radius * 2 + 2);
};

See this on jsFiddle.


globalCompositeOperation

var clearCircle = function(x, y, radius)
{
    context.save();
    context.globalCompositeOperation = 'destination-out';
    context.beginPath();
    context.arc(x, y, radius, 0, 2 * Math.PI, false);
    context.fill();
    context.restore();
};

See this on jsFiddle.


Both gave the desired result on screen, however the performance wasn't sufficient in my case as I was drawing and clearing a lot of circles each frame for an effect. In the end I found a different way to get a similar effect to what I wanted by just drawing thicker lines on an arc, but the above may still be useful to someone having different performance requirements.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, I wonder which one is faster. –  Rui Marques May 29 '13 at 10:54
    
The problem with this is that it also clears the background. See my update to your example: jsfiddle.net/WWH8J/22 I'll post my solution to this problem –  tieTYT May 25 at 20:34

Given the requirements, these answers are fine. But lets say you're like me and you have additional requirements:

  1. You want to "clear" a part of a shape that may be partially outside the bounds of the shape you're clearing.
  2. You want to see the background underneath the shape instead of clearing the background.

For the first requirement, the solution is to use context.globalCompositeOperation = 'destination-out' The blue is the first shape and the red is the second shape. As you can see, destination-out removes the section from the first shape.

enter image description here

Here's some example code:

  explosionCanvasCtx.fillStyle = "red"
  drawCircle(explosionCanvasCtx, projectile.radius, projectile.radius, projectile.radius)
  explosionCanvasCtx.fill()

  explosionCanvasCtx.globalCompositeOperation = 'destination-out' #see https://developer.mozilla.org/samples/canvas-tutorial/6_1_canvas_composite.html
  drawCircle(explosionCanvasCtx, projectile.radius + 20, projectile.radius, projectile.radius)
  explosionCanvasCtx.fill()

Here's the potential problem with this: The second fill() will clear everything underneath it, including the background. Sometimes you'll want to only clear the first shape but you still want to see the layers that are underneath it.

The solution to that is to draw this on a temporary canvas and then drawImage to draw the temporary canvas onto your main canvas. The code will look like this:

  diameter = projectile.radius * 2
  console.log "<canvas width='" + diameter + "' height='" + diameter + "'></canvas>"
  explosionCanvas = $("<canvas width='" + diameter + "' height='" + diameter + "'></canvas>")
  explosionCanvasCtx = explosionCanvas[0].getContext("2d")

  explosionCanvasCtx.fillStyle = "red"
  drawCircle(explosionCanvasCtx, projectile.radius, projectile.radius, projectile.radius)
  explosionCanvasCtx.fill()

  explosionCanvasCtx.globalCompositeOperation = 'destination-out' #see https://developer.mozilla.org/samples/canvas-tutorial/6_1_canvas_composite.html
  durationPercent = (projectile.startDuration - projectile.duration) / projectile.startDuration
  drawCircle(explosionCanvasCtx, projectile.radius + 20, projectile.radius, projectile.radius)
  explosionCanvasCtx.fill()
  explosionCanvasCtx.globalCompositeOperation = 'source-over' #see https://developer.mozilla.org/samples/canvas-tutorial/6_1_canvas_composite.html

  ctx.drawImage(explosionCanvas[0], projectile.pos.x - projectile.radius, projectile.pos.y - projectile.radius) #center
share|improve this answer

Use canvas.getContext("2d").arc(...) to draw a circle over the area with the background colour?

var canvas = document.getElementById("myCanvas");
var context = canvas.getContext("2d");
context.arc(x, y, r, 0, 2*Math.PI, false);
context.fillStyle = "#FFFFFF";
context.fill();
share|improve this answer
    
For performance reasons, this is what should be done instead of clip if the background is opaque, but thats a little unlikely unfortunately. This won't work if the background has any transparency at all. –  Simon Sarris May 1 '12 at 15:47
1  
thank you for taking the time to answer :) sadly in this case the background is not opaque so would not produce the result I was after. –  David Burford May 1 '12 at 17:07

Where x = left position, y = right position, r = radius, and ctx = your canvas:

function clearCircle( x , y , r ){
    for( var i = 0 ; i < Math.round( Math.PI * r ) ; i++ ){
        var angle = ( i / Math.round( Math.PI * r )) * 360;
        ctx.clearRect( x , y , Math.sin( angle * ( Math.PI / 180 )) * r , Math.cos( angle * ( Math.PI / 180 )) * r );
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.