Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
Look at this example

class base {
public:
    int m1;
    base() {
        m1 = 5;
    }
};

class der:  public base  {
public:
    int m1;
    der() {
        m1 = 6;
    }
};

int main() {
    der d;
    cout << d.m1;   
    return 0;
}

Here size of object d is 8 byte, which is allocated for 2 m1(one for base class and other for derive class). What is the mechanism to resolve d.m1?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The m1 in der hides the name of base's m1, so any access to m1 via a der object gets you that instance's der::m1. You can access base::m1 in der like this:

class der:  public base  {
public:
    int m1;
    der() {
        m1 = 6;
        base::m1=7; // access base object's m1 inside der
    }
};

And you can access the base object thus:

der d;
d.base; // base object
std::cout << d.base::m1 >> "\n"; // access base object's m1 outside of der (if allowed)
share|improve this answer

The compiler resolves m1 based on the static type of d. This means that you will get different results for

der d;
cout << d.m1;

and

der d;
base &b = d;
cout << b.m1;

This is because when resolving m1 on an expression of type der, the member der::m1 hides base::m1.

share|improve this answer
2  
And you probably should never do this. –  David Schwartz May 1 '12 at 11:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.