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This program is suppose to accept a number from the user and print that many prime numbers. For some reason the program doesn't work. I am new to bash scripting and this is my first program. To my eyes everything seems to be correct. Please tell me where I went wrong.

echo Enter num
read n
i=2
j=2

for(( i=2; i <= n; i++ ))
do

for(( j=2; j < i-1; j++ ))
do

if [i % j == 0];
then
break
fi


if [i == j];
then
echo "  $i"
fi
done
done

This is the output I get

Enter num
20
prime.sh: line 12: [i: command not found
prime.sh: line 18: [i: command not found
prime.sh: line 12: [i: command not found
prime.sh: line 18: [i: command not found
 .
 .
 .

After making the suggested changes

read -p "Enter a  number : " n
i=2
j=2
for(( i=2; i <= n; i++ ))
do
    for(( j=2; j <= i-1; j++ ))
    do
        if [ $(( i % j )) == 0 ]
        then
            break
        fi
        if [ i == j ]
        then
            echo "  $i"
        fi
    done
done

I was able to run the program but it didn't produce any result

http://i.stack.imgur.com/Fd1se.png

share|improve this question
1  
Bash is very whitespace-sensitive. In this case, you want to replace [i % j == 0] with [ i % j == 0 ]. –  Daniel Kamil Kozar May 1 '12 at 12:10
    
I changed if [i % j == 0] and if [i == j] to if [ i % j == 0 ] and if [ i == j ]. Now it says Line 11: Too many arguments. Line 11 is if [ i % j == 0 ] –  Roger That May 1 '12 at 12:31
    
Also, you need to add the $ symbol when reading variables. Silly me. :P –  Daniel Kamil Kozar May 1 '12 at 12:34
2  
j only runs from 2 to i-1. It will never equal i. –  chepner May 1 '12 at 13:38
1  
In Bash, you should do integer comparisons inside (()), so for example: if (( i % j == 0 )); then and if (( i == j )); then. Dollar signs aren't needed in this case. Also, you need to indent your code. When you do other tests (non-integer) in Bash, you should use double square brackets if [[ $string1 == $string2 ]] rather than single ones. –  Dennis Williamson May 1 '12 at 18:20

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to place a space after the [ because [ is an application.

And you can't make calculations between the brackets. You will need to tell bash it needs to calculate the values. So you would need to change line 11 to if (( i % j == 0 )).

share|improve this answer
    
what about the second if condtion ? –  Roger That May 1 '12 at 12:49
    
The second if is not an calculation however the == is a bash comperator and using -eq is more common which will make if [ $i -eq $j ] –  DipSwitch May 1 '12 at 13:42
    
@DipSwitch: i == j is a calculation. if (( i % j == 0 )) would do it. –  user unknown May 2 '12 at 9:23
    
The application [ / test supports = and == as arguments so you won't need to make that a calculation and if [ $i == $j ]; then ..; fi; would suffice. For the modulo calculation part... I corrected that, thanks :) –  DipSwitch May 2 '12 at 10:47

if [i % j == 0]; Should be if [ i % j == 0 ];

Same for the one on line 18

share|improve this answer
    
should I add a $ sign if [ $i % $j == 0] –  Roger That May 1 '12 at 12:25

Like the others have said, the [ program needs a space before its parameters, like all programs need a space before their args. This is one reason why I prefer the test builtin to [ with its kludgy syntax requiring a useless ] as the last arg just to make it look pretty and sane.

if test $((i % j)) = 0; then
   break
fi
share|improve this answer
    
Is test a keyword ? –  Roger That May 1 '12 at 13:00
    
No, a utility (which many shells provide as a built-in). But on many Unices you will find /bin/test or /usr/bin/test (which are usually hard links to /bin/[ or /usr/bin/[). The differnce is that [ requires ] as the last argument so the syntax looks sane (it serves no other purpose). –  Jens May 1 '12 at 15:01

Try placing your second if test between the two dones :

done

if [ i == j ]
then
echo "  $i"
fi

done
share|improve this answer
    
@RogerThat so have you tried this? Did it work? –  Will Ness May 2 '12 at 10:43
#!/bin/bash
#
# primes
#
read -p "Enter a  number: " n
i=2

for (( i=2; i <= n; i++ ))
do
    for (( j=2; j*j < i; j++ ))
    do
        if ((i % j == 0))
        then
            echo "no prime, $i divider: "$j
            break
        fi
    done
done

updated, after realizing (thanks Will Ness), that all primes up to INPUT are searched.

i needs to run to √(n) only.

share|improve this answer
1  
the OP obviously tries to print out all primes below a given number, hence the two loops. :) –  Will Ness May 2 '12 at 10:41
    
@WillNess: Thanks, updated. –  user unknown May 2 '12 at 15:06

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