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Given the following class:

class MyClass {
  public:
    int value() const {
      return value_;
    }

  private:
    volatile int value_;
};

Does the value() member function also have to be marked as volatile to avoid getting optimized away or is it okay as written? Thanks.

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+1: Good question! I would suggest no, because the compiler already knows not to optimize away value_ –  Nick May 1 '12 at 13:47
    
I would agree with what Nick sayed. I think some guys already had this problem in the past and that it was decided not to optimize when dealing with it :p –  Morwenn May 1 '12 at 13:48
6  
I mention this only because you have "multithreading" tagged and a lot of folks get this confused -- volatile in C++ doesn't make operations on value_ atomic. The way your question is worded, it sounds like you already understand that that :) –  Nathan Monteleone May 1 '12 at 13:51
    
I've read some of the earlier questions/answers but I'm still not certain if this member function should be marked as volatile or not..? –  Switch May 1 '12 at 13:51
    
Why would making the member function volatile affect the optimization? –  juanchopanza May 1 '12 at 13:52
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Does the value() member function also have to be marked as volatile to avoid getting optimized away or is it okay as written?

Marking the member function volatile will have no effect on whether it is optimized away or not. It is fine as written.

The worry is if I have MyClass c; and then call c.value(); a couple times, the compiler might think c.value() will return the same value (even though it could have possibly changed..)

It sounds like what you want is to learn about atomic variables. Take a look at std::atomic.

If you really want to learn about volatile, read this paper: http://www.cs.utah.edu/~regehr/papers/emsoft08-preprint.pdf

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It is completely analogous to how const works.

If you have a const object, only member functions marked const are callable.

And so...

If you have a volatile object, only member functions marked volatile are callable.

As long as the object itself is not volatile, it makes no difference whether the function is.

However, do keep in mind that volatile has nothing to do with multithreading, and it will not help you write thread-safe code. It is the wrong tool for anything concurrency-related.

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I think what leads to a lot of the confusion is that the Win32 atomic APIs InterlockedIncrement et. al. require a volatile parameter. Windows handling of the volatile keyword in general strays significantly from what the C++ standard guarantees. –  Chad May 1 '12 at 14:52
    
They don't require volatile parameters, they accept volatile parameters. –  Bo Persson May 1 '12 at 18:11
    
@Chad: no, you've got it upside down, as I said, it works just like const does. If a function takes a const parameter, that does not mean it requires a const argument. It means it accepts a const argument. A non-const object can always be converted to a const one. And a non-volatile one can always be convered to a volatile one. But you can't go the other way. So if you have a volatile object, you can only call functions that accept a volatile parameter –  jalf May 1 '12 at 19:41
    
See all the confusion ;) I just meant that there is a lot of information on how Windows specifically handles volatile variables that leads to the multithreading confusion relating to them. –  Chad May 1 '12 at 19:47
1  
but the example you cited has nothing to do with what Windows does with volatile. You're right that one point of confusion does exist on Windows. MSVC implements volatile as a full memory barrier, making it somewhat useful for synchronization between threads, even though this is not required by the standard. But there is nothing special about InterlockedIncrement's volatile parameter. That just means that the function accepts both volatile and non-volatile arguments, and has nothing to do with MSVC's handling of volatile –  jalf May 1 '12 at 20:18
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The worry is if I have MyClass c; and then call c.value(); a couple times, the compiler might think c.value() will return the same value (even though it could have possibly changed..)

In a separate compilation model, where the compiler does not see the internals of the function, it cannot assume that they will not have side effects ([*]), and thus cannot remove the different calls to the function. If the compiler is seeing the definition of the function and inlining the code, then it sees that the member is volatile and thus cannot optimize it away either.

[*] Some compilers (namely gcc) have special attributes that you can use to tell it that a function is pure (i.e. it has no side effects and the output depends only on the arguments provided) to enable multiple calls to a function to be optimized away, for example in this loop:

const char* lit = "Literal";
int sum = 0;
for ( int i = 0; i < strlen(lit); ++i ) {
    sum += lit[i];
}

Because strlen is marked as pure in the library, the compiler will cache the value and transform the loop into:

const char* lit = "Literal";
int sum = 0;
int __len = strlen(lit);
for ( int i = 0; i < __len; ++i ) {
    sum += lit[i];
}

But the library must tell the compiler specifically that this can be done. Without the extra information in the shape of attributes, nothing can be assumed and the strlen function would have to be called in each iteration of the loop.

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I think this is the most correct answer. It addresses the issue of being optimized away and why it cannot happen due to the volatile. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y May 1 '12 at 15:11
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Constant and volatile member functions (C++ only)

A member function declared with the const qualifier can be called for constant and nonconstant objects. A nonconstant member function can only be called for a nonconstant object. Similarly, a member function declared with the volatile qualifier can be called for volatile and nonvolatile objects. A nonvolatile member function can only be called for a nonvolatile object.

http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/comphelp/v8v101/index.jsp?topic=%2Fcom.ibm.xlcpp8a.doc%2Flanguage%2Fref%2Fcplr028.htm

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Unrelated: This addresses whether the member function should be volatile based on the premise that the instance of the class is volatile (or not). In the question, the enclosing object is not volatile, rather one of the members of the object is. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 1 '12 at 14:13
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