Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I just started learning ajax recently and Im researching ways of creating HttpRequests
These are the ways I have come up with so far:

function one() {
if(window.XMLHttpRequest) {
    xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
    alert('Other');
} else if (window.ActiveXObject) {
    xhr = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
    alert('windows');
}
return xhr;
}


function two() {
    if(window.XMLHttpRequest) {
        xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
        alert('Other');
    } else if (!window.XMLHttpRequest) {
        xhr = new ActiveXObject('Microsoft.XMLHTTP');
        alert('windows');
    }
    return xhr;
}

function three() {
    if (window.XMLHttpRequest) {
        xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
        alert('Other');
    } else {
        xhr = new ActiveXObject();
        alert('windows');
    }
    return xhr;
}

function four() {
    try {
        xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
        alert('Other');
    } catch (e) {
        xhr = new ActiveXObject();
        alert('windows');
    }
    return xhr;
}

I would like to know more ways of creating the request. If anyone has any other methods of doing this please share them. Part of what I like about Javascript is there are many ways of accomplishing the same tasks and I like to explore all possible options.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Quentin, maerics, j08691, Perception, Matt May 4 '12 at 13:29

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
"Part of what I like about Javascript is there are many ways of accomplishing the same tasks" - in this particular case that is a bug, not a feature. The different ways you are seeing here are exposing incompatibilities and are mutually exclusive. –  Alnitak May 1 '12 at 14:32
    
can you elaborate a bit more –  EnigmaMaster May 1 '12 at 14:36
    
I was talking about the need to use new ActiveXObject vs new XMLHttpRequest and the couple other methods that MSIE supports. The four different functions you've shown are mostly just stylistic choices, although I suspect 3 and 4 won't actually work on old versions of MSIE. –  Alnitak May 1 '12 at 14:38
    
Why we all reinvent the wheel? jQuery for all? –  Bondye May 1 '12 at 14:41
    
stylistic choices is what Im looking for. I want to see other ways of writing the same code. –  EnigmaMaster May 1 '12 at 14:42

2 Answers 2

I generally defer to jQuery when looking for good ways to do things,

// Functions to create xhrs
function createStandardXHR() {
    try {
        return new window.XMLHttpRequest();
    } catch( e ) {}
}

function createActiveXHR() {
    try {
        return new window.ActiveXObject( "Microsoft.XMLHTTP" );
    } catch( e ) {}
}

// Create the request object
// (This is still attached to ajaxSettings for backward compatibility)
jQuery.ajaxSettings.xhr = window.ActiveXObject ?
    /* Microsoft failed to properly
     * implement the XMLHttpRequest in IE7 (can't request local files),
     * so we use the ActiveXObject when it is available
     * Additionally XMLHttpRequest can be disabled in IE7/IE8 so
     * we need a fallback.
     */
    function() {
        return !this.isLocal && createStandardXHR() || createActiveXHR();
    } :
    // For all other browsers, use the standard XMLHttpRequest object
    createStandardXHR;

Source

share|improve this answer
function four() {
  try {
    return new XMLHttpRequest(); 
  } catch (e) // Catch ReferenceError
    return new window.ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.