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How would I go about doing the following in C++ (the following code is C#):

class Base
{
    public virtual void Foo()
    {
        // do stuff...
    }
}

class C : Base
{
    public override void Foo()
    {
        base.Foo(); // <=== how do you do this line?
    }
}
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3  
Stack Overflow is not a code translation service. Explain the requirements in plain English, not in code in another programming language. –  dtb May 1 '12 at 15:13
2  
This code doesn't compile in C# "Cannot call an abstract base member". –  DaveShaw May 1 '12 at 15:14
2  
Richard - post your C++ code so far to avoid boilerplate 'slap on wrist' –  Steve Townsend May 1 '12 at 15:14
2  
Foo is probably not abstract in Base, you wouldn't be able to call it otherwise... –  Jordão May 1 '12 at 15:14
2  
You cannot provide an implementation for an abstract method in C#, and if you remove the implementation you get to the exact error example here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa664435%28v=vs.71%29.aspx. Maybe you did not mean abstract but virtual in the base class's method? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 1 '12 at 15:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use operator :::

class Base
{
public:
    virtual ~Base() {}
    virtual void Foo()
    {
        // do stuff
    }
};

class C : public Base
{
public:
    void Foo()
    {
        Base::Foo();
    }
};

To have an abstract class in C++ at least one method needs to be pure virtual:

class Base
{
public:
    virtual ~Base() {}
    virtual void Foo() {}
    virtual void another_function() = 0; // Pure virtual function.
};
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Base::Foo is supposed to be abstract, so OP can't "do stuff" there. Make it a pure virtual function. Of course, the consequence of that would be that Base::Foo() makes no sense anymore. –  Branko Dimitrijevic May 1 '12 at 15:16
1  
@Branko A pure virtual function can have an implementation, too. –  jrok May 1 '12 at 15:29
    
Perfect, the :: operator was exactly what I was looking for! Thanks! –  rhughes May 1 '12 at 15:37
    
@rhughes except that this doesn't give you what you were asking for, which doesn't make sense in C++. –  juanchopanza May 1 '12 at 15:39
    
@juanchopanza if you look at my original (pre altered by somebody else) code, it answers by question perfectly :) –  rhughes May 1 '12 at 15:44

Like this:

class base {
public:
    virtual void Foo() = 0;
}

class sub : public base {
public:
    void Foo() { 
        std::cout << "In Sub!" << std::endl;
    }
}

Notice the use of the virtual keyword. In C++, unless explicitly declared, function implementations are not looked up at runtime, like C#, Objective-C or Java. Thus, we must tell the runtime that

'Hey, we have a function over here that needs to have it's implementation determined at runtime, so don't assume that it's of a class base, but of a subclass.'

Also note the = 0 part of the function declaration. In C++, this describes a pure virtual function. Without it, base cannot be abstract, unless there is another function that is said to be pure virtual in the class.

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My comment on the q was for OP. sorry for confusion –  Steve Townsend May 1 '12 at 15:19
    
In C#, virtualness is very much explicit, like in C++, but unlike Java . –  Fanael May 1 '12 at 15:24
    
@Fanael not in the same way as C++. I can override a method in C#, cast the subclass to the base class, and when I call the method on the base class, It will call the subclass implementation. That isn't possible in C++ –  Richard J. Ross III May 1 '12 at 15:24
    
@RichardJ.RossIII: I can override a method in C++, cast the subclass to a reference to the base class, and when I call the method on the base class, it will call the subclass implementation. Actually, my point was that in C#, a method is not virtual unless explicitly marked so - just like in C++. –  Fanael May 1 '12 at 15:25

I would just like to point out that you can do this in C++. You just implement the pure virtual function in C++ that is you can do this in your .h:

class Base
{
    public:
       Base();
       virtual ~Base();
       virtual void Foo()=0;
};

and this in your .cpp

void Base::Foo()
{
   std::cout<< "In Base::Foo which is pure virtual\n";
}

Then in your derived class do what the others have indicated and in your Derived::Foo() you can call Base::Foo() which will produce output. Making a function pure virtual does not obviate its a ability to have executable code.

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To make a class abstract in C++, you need to provide it with a pure virtual function. The C++ version of your code would be:

class Base
{
public:
    virtual void Foo() = 0; //setting a virtual function to 0 makes it pure virtual.     This is abstract.
}

class C : Base
{
public:
    void Foo()
    {
        Base::Foo(); //I don't think this line will work...You're calling an abstract method.
    }
}
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