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I'm trying to figure out what the assembly instruction actually does

addsd   -8(%rbp), %xmm0

I know that it's a floating point addition on an x86-64 machine with SSE2. Also, I know that %xmm0 is a register. However, what I'm not sure of is what -8(%rbp) means. The manuals are a bit confusing on that.

Basically, the question is, does -8(%rbp) mean that it's taking a value from a register (maybe the last 8 bytes of rbp) or is it taking a value from memory (floating point value at an offset of -8 from the address contained in rbp).

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2  
Your second guess is correct. It's accessing the value at -8 bytes offset from address rbp. – Mysticial May 1 '12 at 15:30
    
Hey Mysticial, can you point to a reference that explains this easily? – owagh May 1 '12 at 15:40
    
Confusing AT&T syntax strikes again. – harold May 1 '12 at 15:45
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your second guess is correct. It's accessing the value at -8 bytes offset from address rbp.

Assuming AT&T syntax, this instruction loads an 8-byte double from address rbp - 8 and adds it to the value in the lower half of xmm0.

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Can you point to a reference that explains this easily? Most of the assembly language tutorials and references are hopelessly obfuscated (or so I feel. maybe it's just me) – owagh May 1 '12 at 15:41
    
I'm trying to find one right now. But the relative addressing thing might be a bit on the basic side. – Mysticial May 1 '12 at 15:43
3  
Here it is: en.wikibooks.org/wiki/X86_Assembly/GAS_Syntax – Mysticial May 1 '12 at 15:45
    
Hey thanks. This is actually pretty useful. – owagh May 1 '12 at 16:07

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