Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i'm looking for the comparison of these option workflows (#1 and #2 as below). So i'm using function xx() which is calling another x() function. This is generic programming workflow (the code is python syntax but the flow logic can apply to any other language).

So the option#1 show workflow where i have to pass argument from one function to another, while in #2 i don't have to pass all the argument , just the ouput of first function as argument to the second function.

option #1 :

def x(a):
    <code>
    return  value

def xx(a):
    x=x(a)
    <code>
    return value

print xx(a)

option #2 :

def x(a):
    <code>
    return  value

def xx(x):
    <code>
    return value

x=x(a)
print xx(x)

It's just simple example. What i found so far in option#1 that every argument passed into x() has to pass into xx() as well. example when passing a lot argument (this is basic example where i don't use * or ** for passing multiple argument):

option#1

def x(a1,a2,….a100):
    <code>
    return value

def xx(b1,b2,…..b100):
    x=x(b1,b2,….b100)
    <code>
    return value

print xx(45,'test',....,999)

option#2

def x(a1,a2,….a100):
    <code>
    return value

def xx(x):
    <code>
    return value

x=x(45,'test',....,999)
print xx(x)

in #1 , i have to do a lot of 'typing' to input the argument to pass in def xx() , in otherhand, #2 is cleaner ,esier to debug. So what do u guyz think about these workflows? does workflow#1 have some advantages? is #2 generally better ? what do you think? what reason to choose #1 or #2.

share|improve this question
    
The answer to this, of course, is to use OOP. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 2 '12 at 6:09
    
thanx , i've modified code so it's not oop style. The previous example maybe not the correct one. I made it more generic. –  andio May 7 '12 at 3:42

1 Answer 1

select_color_from_obj seems to be an unnecessary function. You could just call

get_obj().color()

Also if get_obj() is in the same scope as the other code you could just access the object directly with

obj.color()

However if the definition of obj appears in a different file, then get_obj may be useful.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi thanx for answering my question, yes that's right but that's not what i'm looking for :), i'm looking for the comparison for two workflow. Try another more generic example : –  andio May 3 '12 at 2:45
    
I'm not too sure what these workflows are trying to accomplish. Are you trying to build another layer of abstraction on top of OO? What organization are these schemes adding that is not found in public method interfaces? Perhaps a more elaborated usage might be more insightful. –  kunwoo32 May 3 '12 at 22:16
    
Sorry i might have posted unproper example in my first post ... so i've just modified the question to be more specific. You can re-review it if you got time. THanx a lot. –  andio May 8 '12 at 5:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.