Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I was in a middle of making NAT traversal.

The scenario is next: I got two Android phones and I want to connect them(sockets) using HTTP server(both devices are behind NAT).

So far so good, both clients connect to HTTP server, HTTP server records their IP address&PORTS,

however there is a little problem, since I use Java HttpDefaultClient(), it will change the port each time I send request from client to the server. Okay that sounds like simple problem: let's just use Socket() to actually maintain a valid TCP connection into server.

public Socket(InetAddress address, int port, InetAddress localAddr, int localPort) throws IOException

I will just use this class and put the localPort something random which I will remember. Now I do everything again, this time it seems that port wont change, like I want.

Now after I have opponent's IP&port(he's also behind NAT), theoretically I could drop the SERVER connection and use the same localPort I already used to actually host a clientServer?

unless, and now comes the part where I have question: 1)If I drop the HTTP server socket, will NAT understand that and remove the port mapping?(that's bad) 2) How does actually passing symmetric-cone nat work? 3) does the STUN libraries work somehow differently?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

NATs don't all work the same, but you can count on a few things: 1) if your client thinks it's on port X, the NAT will translate that to a different port 2) NATs usually let in packets that are in response to outgoing packets.

STUN tries to guess, with a server's help, what the actual outgoing port is, and then pass off the address+port to the other client. It's not terribly reliable. TURN just routes everything through the server. That's more reliable, although it incurs CPU and bandwidth cost on the server.

If you can use existing code to do NAT traversal, you'll save yourself a lot of trouble. Otherwise, do something like TURN through sockets, OR use something like Urban Airship. I've also used binary SMS, but that was for a special case.

share|improve this answer

With most (but not all) NATs these days, you can assume some consistency and predictable port mapping behavior. (That is, using the same local port for different server connections, maps to the same local port on the NAT). But it sounds like you want to do NAT traversal over TCP, which is a harder problem than UDP.

The fundamental problem is that most NATs are also acting as firewalls. They won't allow an inbound connection from a remote ip:port. I believe the trick is to do a simultaneous connect on both sides.

You can read more about TCP hole punching here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TCP_hole_punching

share|improve this answer

I think you are running into a couple issues with regards to Nats. I actually got this to work awhile back(creating a peer to peer android connection utilizing a third part server(mine) and a public STUN server.

I'd highly suggest your read RFC5389 - Nat traversal It's complicated. I'd also suggest you use something like the JStun library or implement your own as i did.

I will just use this class and put the localPort something random which I will remember. Now I do everything again, this time it seems that port wont change, like I want.

My guess would be your behind a nat, so the internal port you requested got mapped to a different outside port.

Now after I have opponent's IP&port(he's also behind NAT), theoretically I could drop the SERVER connection and use the same localPort I already used to actually host a clientServer?

Not yet, most nats not only record the ports that clients made connecttions two but the IP address they connected to so they will block traffic from other IP's. For instance, Phone1 is on IP-a and connects to server from ip-a on port-b The nat translates port-b to port-c. From the servers point of view the phone is at IP-a on port-c. It relays this information to phone2. The nat will block all communication from phone2 until phone1 sends data to phone2 from port-b.

1)If I drop the HTTP server socket, will NAT understand that and remove the port mapping?(that's bad) 2)

Something I learned from experiance is not to expect anything from the nats port mapping behaivor except that your port will be mapped, and some nats will change said mapping for what from your point of view seems like silly reasons. This requires a lot of updating. But in general no.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.