Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to write a function template. One version should be used for all types that don't satisfy the criteria for the other version; the other version should be used when the argument is a base class of a given class, or that class itself.

I have tried doing an overload for Base&, but when classes are derived from Base, they use the general one, not the specific one.

I also have tried this SFINAE approach:

struct Base { };

struct Derived : public Base { };

struct Unrelated { };

template<typename T>
void f(const T& a, bool b = true) {
    cout << "not special" << endl;
}

template<typename T>
void f(const Base& t, bool b = is_base_of<Base, T>::value) {
    cout << "special" << endl;
}

Base b;
Derived d;
Unrelated u;

f(b); f(d); f(u);

But all of them print "not special". I am not good at SFINAE and I am probably just doing it wrong. How can I write a function like this?

share|improve this question
    
Are you looking for a C++03 or C++11 solution? –  ildjarn May 1 '12 at 17:34
    
@ildjarn either. –  Seth Carnegie May 1 '12 at 17:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First, none of these will ever call the "special" f overload because T cannot be deduced from the function arguments. Its first parameter needs to be of type T:

void f(const T& t, bool b = is_base_of<Base, T>::value)

Once that is done, note that the "special" overload doesn't really use SFINAE to affect overload resolution: is_base_of<T, U>::value always has a value: it's either true or false. To affect overload resolution, you need to use enable_if, which conditionally defines a type based on a boolean value.

Also, both overloads need to use SFINAE: the "special" overload must be enabled if T is derived from the base (or is the base type), and the "not special" overload must be enabled only if T is not derived from the base, otherwise there will be overload resolution ambiguities.

The two overloads should be declared and defined as:

template<typename T>
void f(T const& a, typename enable_if<!is_base_of<Base, T>::value>::type* = 0)
{
    cout << "not special" << endl;
}

template<typename T>
void f(T const& t, typename enable_if<is_base_of<Base, T>::value>::type* = 0)
{
    cout << "special" << endl;
}

Finally, note that there is no specialization here. These two functions named f are overloads.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, works nicely. I wish there were a way to do it without polluting the argument list though, but I doubt that is possible without using a class wrapper or something which I don't want to do. –  Seth Carnegie May 1 '12 at 17:59
    
You can "pollute" the return type, if you prefer (just move the typename enable_if etc. to be the return type). Either way works equally well. Neither is particularly readable :-) –  James McNellis May 1 '12 at 18:04
    
Unfortunately the return value is used though, so can't do that. –  Seth Carnegie May 1 '12 at 18:07
    
typename enable_if<is_base_of<Base, T>::value, int>::type f() will give f() a return type of int if T is derived from or is Base. The second template argument of enable_if is optional and defaults to void, but you can specify any type. –  James McNellis May 1 '12 at 18:10
    
Wha, how stupid of me. I am making many stupid mistakes today. –  Seth Carnegie May 1 '12 at 18:12

Here's a simple C++03 approach:

namespace detail // implementation details, users never invoke these directly
{
    template<bool B>
    struct f_impl
    {
        template<typename T>
        static void f(T const& t) { std::cout << "not special\n"; }
    };

    template<>
    struct f_impl<true>
    {
        static void f(Base const& t) { std::cout << "special\n"; }
    };
}

template<typename T>
void f(T const& t)
{
    detail::f_impl<is_base_of<Base, T>::value>::f(t);
}

Live demo.

share|improve this answer
    
The non-SFINAE overloading does not work because "not special" is an exact match for Derived, but "special" requires a derived-to-base conversion, so "not special" is selected during overload resolution. –  James McNellis May 1 '12 at 17:45
    
Your second approach does not work, since the templated overload is more suitable for class Derived than the Base argument one. –  mfontanini May 1 '12 at 17:45
    
Yes, I edited that out just after editing it in. :-P –  ildjarn May 1 '12 at 17:46
    
Thanks, but I would like to use something that doesn't require people to go through a class to get to the function. +1 though since it does work. –  Seth Carnegie May 1 '12 at 18:03
    
@Seth : To be clear, f_impl<> is an implementation detail; users would only ever call the globally-scoped f function template. I'll edit to clarify. –  ildjarn May 1 '12 at 18:05

One way to do it with overloading would be like this:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct Base { };

struct Derived : public Base { };

struct Unrelated { };

void f(...) {
    cout << "not special" << endl;
}

void f(const Base& t) {
    cout << "special" << endl;
}

int main(){ 
    Base b;
    Derived d;
    Unrelated u;

    f(b); 
    f(d);
    f(u);

    return 0;
}

Result:

special
special
not special

An overload taking a variable argument list will take any type of argument, but is always considered less suitable than any other overload that works at all.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a nice way, except I do need to access the arguments non-variadically. –  Seth Carnegie May 1 '12 at 17:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.