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Currently in my code I have something in a for loop similar to:

bstr = bstr + x.charAt(i) + x.charAt(i>>4) + x.charAt(i>>8);

Where i is an integer and the loop variable and x is a static final constant string of characters. bstr could be in the order of KBs.

Thanks

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A performant way to do this is to use a StringBuilder to concatenate your string:

StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
for(int i = 0; i < count; i++){
    builder.append(x.charAt(i));
    builder.append(x.charAt(i>>4));
    builder.append(x.charAt(i>>8));
}

return builder.toString();

This technique avoids the problem of storing all the copies of Strings between concatentations across the for loop.

edit:

or does this work for you (without adding chars one at a time):

StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
for(int i = 0; i < count; i++){
    builder.append(x);
}

return builder.toString();
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3  
What do you meane by "all the combinations of concatenations"? An expression such as a + b + c is compiled as new StringBuilder().append(a).append(b).append(c).toString() –  aioobe May 1 '12 at 18:53
1  
Using StringBuilder is a nice way to accomplish this. However, since Java 5, the compiler may automatically convert concatenations into usage of StringBuilder: java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/Interviews/community/… –  Peter May 1 '12 at 18:53
2  
The JVM does not convert concatenations across a for loop as the question states. –  johncarl May 1 '12 at 18:55
2  
So, yes the contents of the for loop would be concatenated properly, but across iterations the concatenations would still store each iterative copy. –  johncarl May 1 '12 at 19:00

Create a StringBuilder before the loop and reuse it:

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

while (someCondition) {
    ...
    sb.append(x.charAt(i))
      .append(x.charAt(i >> 4))
      .append(x.charAt(i >> 8));
    ...
}

bstr = sb.toString();
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Use a StringBuilder and just append while you're looping.

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
sb.append(bstr);
for(int i=0; i < somecondition; i++){
  sb.append(x.charAt(i)).append(x.charAt(i>>4)).append(x.charAt(i>>8));  
}
System.out.println(sb.toString());
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One option is to use the StringBuilder class. It has an internal array of char, which it appends your contents to until you call the toString method, at which point it creates a new String object. Of course, since it's using an array to store your characters, it may run out of space, at which point it will copy the contents into a new larger array. You can avoid that by initially giving it a capacity that will be large enough to hold the final String.

// Create a new StringBuilder with an initial capacity that is a little larger than the final String
StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder(estimatedSizeOfFinalString);
int i = 0;
while (loopConditionIsTrue) {
    builder.append(x.charAt(i)).append(x.charAt(i >> 4)).append(x.charAt(i >> 8);
}
String bstr = builder.toString();
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