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In a C program in UNIX, gethostbyname() can be used to obtain the address of domain like "localhost". How does one convert the result from gethostbyname() to dotted decimal notation.

struct hostent* pHostInfo;
long nHostAddress;

/* get IP address from name */
pHostInfo=gethostbyname("localhost");

if(!pHostInfo){
    printf("Could not resolve host name\n");
    return 0;
}

/* copy address into long */
memset(&nHostAddress, 0, sizeof(nHostAddress));
memcpy(&nHostAddress,pHostInfo->h_addr,pHostInfo->h_length);

nHostAddress contains the following:

16777243

How do I convert the result so that I can get the output as :

127.0.0.1

Thanks.

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2  
    
You just have to format it properly; each byte corresponds to one IP field (e.g. first byte is 127, etc) –  Seth Carnegie May 1 '12 at 19:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can convert from a struct in_addr directly to a string using inet_ntoa():

char *address = inet_ntoa(pHostInfo->h_addr);

The value you've got (16777243) looks wrong, though -- that comes out to 1.0.0.27!

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Probably to do with the endianness of his computer or something. –  Seth Carnegie May 1 '12 at 19:46
    
I could understand 1.0.0.127, but the 27 is inexplicable. –  duskwuff May 1 '12 at 19:47
    
It actually comes to be 1.0.0.127, @duskwuff please check it again. –  Jake May 1 '12 at 20:11
    
Odd... I'm using socket.inet_ntoa(struct.pack(">L", 16777243)) in a Python shell and getting '1.0.0.27' out. –  duskwuff May 1 '12 at 20:14

The inet_ntoa() API does what you're looking for, but is apparently deprecated:

http://www.retran.com/beej/inet_ntoaman.html

If you want something more future-proof-IPV6ish, there's inet_ntop():

http://www.beej.us/guide/bgnet/output/html/multipage/inet_ntopman.html

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