Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a few logic that looks like

if(a){
 if(b){
  if(c){
    //do something
  }else{
    //do something
  }    
 }else{
  if(c){
    //do something
  }else{
    //do something
  }    
 }else{
 if(b){
  if(c){
    //do something
  }else{
    //do something
  }    
 }else{
  if(c){
    //do something
  }else{
    //do something
  }    
}

What is the best way tot implement this into readable logic? I dont want to do some big OOP surgery to make it readable because the do something is just one liner. Solution in C/C++ is appreciated

share|improve this question
    
A ... switch...? –  chris May 1 '12 at 19:43
2  
A switch is not a general purpose solution depending on what you've to test. I remember having done the same thing with arrays of function pointers, a custom algorithm and some basic refactoring. –  dirkgently May 1 '12 at 19:45
    
um #{ =14 but #} =12 –  violet313 May 1 '12 at 20:02
2  
@violet313 that's the curse of egyptian brackets –  stefan May 1 '12 at 20:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Since the conditions are boolean, and apparently independent, treat them as bits in a word and switch on them:

#include <cstdio>

#define COMPOSE(a,b,c) ( ((!!(a)) << 2) | ((!!(b))<<1) | (!!(c)) )

int f(int i, int j, int k) {

  switch(COMPOSE( i==j, i+j<k, k!=42)) {
  case COMPOSE(true, true, true):
    printf("yo\n");
    break;
  case COMPOSE(true, true, false):
    printf("ye\n");
    break;
  case COMPOSE(true, false, true):
    printf("ya\n");
    break;
  }
}

int main () {
  f(1,1,1);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I am taking this as an answer because this leads to some interesting template magic that I am developing to aid readability and aid performance –  leon May 30 '12 at 2:46

If all //do something are fundamentally different, you don't have much choice (afaik).

For code style I would prefer

if ( a && b && c ) 
{
}
else if ( a && b && !c )
{
}
else if ( a && !b && c )
...

This removes the necessity of multiple levels of indentation and makes it clear which condition is actually satisfied.

Side note: obviously a && b && !c can be stated as a && b because !(a && b && c) and the use of else if. I would leave it there anyway because the compiler might optimize it and the code looks cleaner.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.