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The class won't add on to the Stopwatch time using Speedrun.AddToTime(h, m, s)

No clue as to why!

class Speedrun
    {
        private static Stopwatch sr = new Stopwatch();

        public static void Go()
        {
            sr.Reset();
            sr.Start();
        }

        public static string GetTime
        {
            get
            {
                return sr.Elapsed.Hours + "h " + sr.Elapsed.Minutes + "m " + sr.Elapsed.Seconds + "s";
            }

        }

        public static void AddToTime(int hours, int minutes, int seconds)
        {
            TimeSpan ts = new TimeSpan(hours, minutes, seconds);
            sr.Elapsed.Add(ts);

        }

        public static void Stop()
        {
            sr.Stop();
        }

        public static void Cont()
        {
            sr.Start();
        }
    }

Fairly straight forward, I'm referencing it using the class name itself, instead of a variable. As seen here

Speedrun.Go();

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

UPDATE!!

CHEAP solution found here it is to help you guys that might have the similar situation

class Speedrun
{
    private static Stopwatch sr = new Stopwatch();

    private static int addedhours = 0;
    private static int addedminutes = 0;
    private static int addedseconds = 0;


    public static void Go()
    {
        sr.Reset();
        sr.Start();
        addedhours = 0;
        addedminutes = 0;
        addedseconds = 0;
    }

    public static string GetTime
    {
        get
        {
            return (sr.Elapsed.Hours + addedhours) + "h " + (sr.Elapsed.Minutes + addedminutes) + "m " + (sr.Elapsed.Seconds + addedseconds) + "s";
        }

    }

    public static void AddToTime(int hours, int minutes, int seconds)
    {
        addedhours = addedhours + hours;
        addedminutes = addedminutes + minutes;
        addedseconds = addedseconds + seconds;

    }

    public static void Stop()
    {
        sr.Stop();
    }

    public static void Cont()
    {
        sr.Start();
    }
}
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4 Answers 4

You're calling Add on a TimeSpan. TimeSpan is an immutable value type. You're doing nothing with the result here:

sr.Elapsed.Add(ts);

... so it's effectively a no-op. Even if TimeSpan were immutable, it's still a value type - so you'd be fetching the property value (which would make a copy), then calling Add, and the mutated copy would then be lost.

Basically, what you're trying to do here won't work.

EDIT: Your workaround doesn't really work either, because if it's taken 35 seconds and you're adding 30 seconds, you'll end up reporting 65 seconds instead of 1 minutes and 5 seconds.

You should keep just a TimeSpan to add, then you can use something like:

public static string GetTime
{
    get
    {
        TimeSpan time = sr.Elapsed + timeToAdd;
        // In .NET 4 you could use a custom format string for the TimeSpan
        return string.Format("{0}h {1}m {2}s",
                             time.Hours, time.Minutes, time.Seconds);
    }
}

I'm somewhat dubious of the overall design though - in particular, all these statics without any attempt at thread-safety makes me nervous... Do you really need all of this to be static to start with?

share|improve this answer
    
Even if TimeSpan were immutable er, you mean mutable? –  vcsjones May 1 '12 at 20:16
    
Ohhhh, I see. But still can't figure out a bloody solution. I did however come up with one that is cheap, which works the same way. I'll post it. –  JeremyC May 1 '12 at 20:22
    
@user537156: Your solution is a bit broken. I'll edit to suggest an alternative... –  Jon Skeet May 1 '12 at 20:34

StopWatch.Elapsed returns a new TimeSpan object. Calling Add on that object creates yet another TimeSpan object, which you then discard.

You're not writing anything back to your StopWatch object.

Try this:

class Speedrun
{
    private static Stopwatch sr = new Stopwatch();
    private static TimeSpan elapsed = new TimeSpan();

    public static void Go()
    {
        elapsed = new TimeSpan(0);
        sr.Reset();
        sr.Start();
    }

    public static string GetTime
    {
        get
        {
            elapsed = elapsed.Add(sr.Elapsed);
            return elapsed.Hours + "h " + elapsed.Minutes + "m " + elapsed.Seconds + "s";
        }

    }

    public static void AddToTime(int hours, int minutes, int seconds)
    {
        TimeSpan ts = new TimeSpan(hours, minutes, seconds);
        elapsed = elapsed.Add(ts);
    }

    public static void Stop()
    {
        sr.Stop();
    }

    public static void Cont()
    {
        sr.Start();
    }
}

FYI, GetTime is an appropriate name for a method. A better name for a property would simply be Time or ElapsedTime.

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1  
All he really needs to do is give his class a TimeSpan member, put the result of sr.Elapsed.Add(ts); into that, and then reference it instead of the StopWatch in the GetTime method... –  Dan J May 1 '12 at 20:22

TimeSpan.Add() doesn't modify the existing value, but returns a new resultant TimeSpan. So you'll need to change:

sr.Elapsed.Add(ts);

... so that it actually stores the result somewhere useful.

share|improve this answer
    
That stores the result in a temporary object which is then discarded. –  Mud May 1 '12 at 20:17
    
@Mud: It doesn't have to. The author would need to handle that logic outside of the Stopwatch. –  Austin Salonen May 1 '12 at 20:19
2  
@MUd what are you talking about? I said the OP needs to store the result somewhere useful. I was quoting their current code, not the code to change to. Please read responses carefully, especially before handing out negative reputation. –  itsme86 May 1 '12 at 20:21
    
@itsme86 Gotcha. Can't retract my vote unless you edit your answer. –  Mud May 1 '12 at 20:25

See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.timespan.add.aspx

Add returns a new TimeSpan object rather than mutating the existing, and since StopWatch.Elapsed is readonly I don't know if you can accomplish what you're trying

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