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I'm wondering what's the best way to do validation of database constraints (e.g. UNIQUE) in a ASP.NET MVC application, build with DDD in mind, where the underlying layers are Application Layer (application services), Domain Layer (domain model) and Infrastructure Layer (persistance logic, logging, etc.).

I've been looking through lots of DDD samples, but what many of them doesn't mention is how to do validation in the repository (I suppose that this is where this type of validation fits). If you know of any samples doing this, please share them it will be much appreciated.

More specific, I have two questions. How would you perform the actual validation? Would you explicitly check if a customer name already exists by querying the database, or would you try inserting it directly in the database and catching the error if any (seems messy)? I prefer the first one, and if choosing this, should it be done in the repository, or should it be the job of a application service?

When the error is detected, how would you pass it to ASP.NET MVC so the user can be informed nicely about the error? Preferably using the ModelStateDictionary so the error is easily highlighted on the form.

In the N-Lyered app by Microsoft Spain, they use the IValidatableObject interface and the most simple property validation is placed on the entity itself, such as:

public IEnumerable<ValidationResult> Validate(ValidationContext validationContext)
{
    var validationResults = new List<ValidationResult>();

    if (String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(this.FirstName))
        validationResults.Add(new ValidationResult(Messages.validation_CustomerFirstNameCannotBeNull, new string[] { "FirstName" }));

    return validationResults;
}

Before the entity is persisted, the Validate message is called to ensure that the properties are valid:

void SaveCustomer(Customer customer)
{
    var validator = EntityValidatorFactory.CreateValidator();

    if (validator.IsValid(customer)) //if customer is valid
    {
        _customerRepository.Add(customer);
        _customerRepository.UnitOfWork.Commit();
    }
    else
        throw new ApplicationValidationErrorsException(validator.GetInvalidMessages<Customer>(customer));
}

The ApplicationValidationErrorsException can then be catched in the MVC application and the validation error messages can be parsed and inserted into the ModelStateDictionary.

I could add all the validation logic into the SaveCustomer method, e.g. querying the database checking if a customer already exists using a given column (the UNIQUE one). Maybe this is okay, but I would rather that the validator.IsValid (or something similar) would do this for me, or that validation is performed once again in the Infrastructure layer (if it belongs here, im not sure).

What do you think? How do you do it? I'm very interesting in gaining more insight into different validation techniques in layered applications.


Possible solution #1

In the case where the validation logic can't be done in the presentation layer (like Iulian Margarintescu suggests) and needs to be done in the service layer, how would you pass validation errors up to the presentation layer?

Microsoft has a suggestion here (see listing 5). What do you think about that approach?

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2  
I'd advise you to read Ayende's review of the sample app, it consists of several posts, starting here. To which the sample app's author repsonded here. My conclusion was not to spend too much time with this sample app. –  Marijn May 2 '12 at 6:32
2  
Drop all that MS technical mess out of the window. Start from scratch, in pure c#. Create simple class library project and try to model your domain as if there were no need for persisting anything in database. Only then you will be able to actually understand what kind of frameworks you need to add to make it run/look good and what bad impacts they are forcing on your code base. When you start with big-ass architecture without thinking about domain, drowning into maze of meaningless puzzles is quite inevitable. –  Arnis L. May 2 '12 at 7:55
    
I know that, and yes, I used the word "much like" which actually isn't the case. Some implementation like the unit of work and repository is inspired by their sample but I'm far from using all their components. My application is very much plain C# except from Unity, Entity Framework (DbContext) and AutoMapper. –  Tommy Jakobsen May 2 '12 at 14:51
    
I have removed my mentioning of the MS sample app because it wasn't relevant for the question. –  Tommy Jakobsen May 2 '12 at 15:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You mention DDD, yet there is a lot more to DDD than entities and repositories. I assume you are familiar with Mr Eric Evans's book Domain Driven Design and i would strongly suggest you re-read the chapters about strategic design and bounded contexts. Also Mr Evans has a very nice talk called "What i've learned about DDD since the book" that you can find here. Talks about SOA, CQRS and event sourcing from Greg Young or Udi Dahan also contain a lot of information about DDD and applying DDD. I must warn you that you might discover things that will change the way you think about applying DDD.

Now for your question about validation - One approach might be to query the db (using an Ajax call that is directed to an app service) as soon as the user types something in the "name" field and try to suggest an alternative name if the one he entered already exists. When the user submits the form, try to insert the record in the db and handle any duplicate key exception (at the repository or app service level) . Since you are already checking for duplicates ahead of time the cases where you get an exception should be fairly rare so any decent "We are sorry, please retry" message should do since, unless you have A LOT of users they will probably never see it.

This post from Udi Dahan also has some information on approaching validation. Remember that this might be a constraint you are imposing on the business instead of a constraint that the business imposes on you - Maybe it provides more value for the business to allow customers with the same name to register, instead of rejecting them.

Also remember that DDD is a lot more about business than it is about technology. You can do DDD and deploy your app as a single assembly. Layers of client code on top of services on top of entities on top of repositories on top of databases have been abused so many times in the name of "good" design, without any reasons for why it is a good design.

I'm not sure this will answer your question(s) but i hope it will guide you to find the answers yourself.

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Thanks for your answer Lulian. I'm very well aware that DDD is A LOT more than what I've mentioned, and I've read Evans book plenty of times and seen his talk you're linking to, my question was more about validation and where to perform it. I should never have mentioned DDD, as people tend to freak out (not saying that you did) :-) But I'm still learning and right now it's about validation logic and where to put it. You have me some good instructions, and I'll take a look at the post you mentioed. Thank you! –  Tommy Jakobsen May 2 '12 at 15:01
    
The customer name is a simple example that can be handled by the client by providing a service as you mention. But when the validation gets more complicated and in the case where it can't be done in the presentation layer, how would you pass validation results from the service layer to the presentation layer? MS has a suggestion here: asp.net/mvc/tutorials/older-versions/models-(data)/… (see listing 5). What do you think about that approach? –  Tommy Jakobsen May 2 '12 at 15:54
    
I personally don't like that approach, because it implies you can create an invalid product and rely on a service to add additional logic. This also implies that the model is actually and anemic domain model which if you try to do DDD is an anti-pattern. You can have the presentation layer call a service with a DTO as soon as possible ( but before the actual creation of the AR) with the only purpose applying validation logic. The service could return the validation result directly and the presentation layer can just display it. –  Iulian Margarintescu May 3 '12 at 3:59
    
At the time of the AR creation, if invalid state is detected throw an exception. The actual validation logic can be in a shared assembly if code duplication is a concern. Also there are two types of validation - Aggregate Roos invariants validation, and basic UI validation. You can't and you should not do invariant validation outside of the aggregate root as it is tightly related to the AR boundaries. Basic UI validation you should do as soon as possible to prevent invalid state. Hope it makes sense. –  Iulian Margarintescu May 3 '12 at 4:05

I'm wondering what's the best way to do validation of database constraints (e.g. UNIQUE)

and if choosing this, should it be done in the repository, or should it be the job of a application service?

It depends on what you are validating.

If it's an aggregate root creation you are trying to validate - then there is nothing more global than app itself that "holds" it. In this case, I apply validation directly in repository.

If it's an entity, it lives in aggregate root context. In this case I'm validating entity uniqueness in aggregate root itself against all the other entities in this particular aggregate root. Same goes for value objects in entities/roots.

P.s. repository is a service. Do not look at services as universal store for necessary but hard to name properly code. Naming matters. The same goes with names like "Helpers", "Managers", "Common", "Utilities", etc. - they are pretty much meaningless.

Also - you don't need to pollute your code base with pattern names: AllProducts > ProductRepository; OrderRegistrator > OrderService; order.isCompleted > IsOrderCompletedSpecification.IsSatisfiedBy.

More specific, I have two questions. How would you perform the actual validation? Would you explicitly check if a customer name already exists by querying the database, or would you try inserting it directly in the database and catching the error if any (seems messy)?

I would query the database. Although, if high performance is a concern and customer name availability is only thing that database should enforce - I would go with relying on database (1 less round trip).

When the error is detected, how would you pass it to ASP.NET MVC so the user can be informed nicely about the error? Preferably using the ModelStateDictionary so the error is easily highlighted on the form.

Usually it is not a good idea to use exceptions for controlling flow of application, but, since I want to enforce UI to show only available things that can be done, I'm just throwing exception in case validation fails. In UI layer, there's a handler that neatly picks it up and spits out in html.

Also - it is important to understand what is the scope of command (e.g. product ordering command might check 2 things - if customer ain't debtor and if product is in store). If command has multiple associated validations, those should be coupled together so UI would receive them simultaneously. Otherwise it would lead to annoying user experience (going through multiple errors while trying to order that damn product over and over again).

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