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I am making an interpreter for a custom programming language (concatenative, soft-typed) and for that purpose I have a central datatype Token. A Token can be of one of the many different types, either of scalar ones or vector ones. To minimize the amount of memory, I used a union first but then I could only use plain-old data structures in the union, so I resorted to a struct with all the fields (long asInteger;, boost::shared_ptr<std::string> asString, ...). That was of course a bad idea from a memory consumption viewpoint but it got the job done.

Since the Token datatype was almost 100 bytes long (making an array of 1,000,000 integers almost 100 megabytes for example), the original formulation showed massively inadequate. Today I revamped the implementation to dynamically allocate the memory needed for each element with copy semantics so that I got something similar to the union if I could use it with classes.

This is the new class definition:

class Token {
protected:
    TokenType tokenType_;

    template<class T>
    inline void copyToken(void * src, void * dst)
    {
      *static_cast<T*>(dst) = 
          *static_cast<T*>(src);
    };

    template<class T>
    inline void deleteValue()
    {
      delete static_cast<T*>(data);
    };

    void deleteData()
    {
        switch (tokenType_)
        {
            case T_INTEGER:   deleteValue<long>(); break; 
            case T_BOOL:      deleteValue<bool>(); break; 
            case T_FLOAT:     deleteValue<double>(); break;
            case T_STRING:    deleteValue<boost::shared_ptr<std::string>>(); break;  
            case T_ARRAY:     deleteValue<boost::shared_ptr<std::vector<Token>>>(); break;
            case T_HANDLE:    deleteValue<HandleData>(); break;
            default: ;
        }
    }

    void allocate(const TokenType tokenType)
    {       
        switch (tokenType)
        {
            case T_INTEGER:   data = new long; break; 
            case T_BOOL:      data = new bool;  break; 
            case T_FLOAT:     data = new double; break;
            case T_STRING:    data = new boost::shared_ptr<std::string>; break;  
            case T_ARRAY:     data = new boost::shared_ptr<std::vector<Token>>; break;
            case T_HANDLE:    data = new HandleData; break;
            default: data = NULL;
        }     
    };

    void * data;

public:

    void set_type(const TokenType tokenType)
    {
        deleteData();
        tokenType_ = tokenType;
        allocate(tokenType);
    };

    Token() : tokenType_ (T_EMPTY) { data = NULL; }; 

    Token(const TokenType tokenType) : tokenType_ (tokenType)  
    {
        allocate(tokenType);
    };

    Token(const Token& old_token)  
    {
        tokenType_ = old_token.tokenType_;
        allocate(old_token.tokenType_);
        switch (old_token.tokenType_)
        {
            case T_INTEGER:   copyToken<long>(old_token.data, data); break; 
            case T_BOOL:      copyToken<bool>(old_token.data, data); break; 
            case T_FLOAT:     copyToken<double>(old_token.data, data); break;
            case T_STRING:    copyToken<boost::shared_ptr<std::string>>(old_token.data, data); break; 
            case T_ARRAY:     copyToken<boost::shared_ptr<std::vector<Token>>>(old_token.data, data); break;
            case T_HANDLE:    copyToken<HandleData>(old_token.data, data); break;
            default: ;
        }       
    };

    template<class T>
    T& retreive()
    {
        return *static_cast<T*>(data);
    };

    template<class T>
    const T& retreive() const
    {
        return *static_cast<T*>(data);
    };

    void operator=(const Token &rhs) 
    {
        fileName = rhs.fileName;
        lineNum  = rhs.lineNum;
        set_type(rhs.tokenType_);
        switch (rhs.tokenType_)
        {
            case T_INTEGER:   copyToken<long>(rhs.data, data); break; 
            case T_BOOL:      copyToken<bool>(rhs.data, data); break; 
            case T_FLOAT:     copyToken<double>(rhs.data, data); break;
            case T_STRING:    copyToken<boost::shared_ptr<std::string>>(rhs.data, data); break; 
            case T_ARRAY:     copyToken<boost::shared_ptr<std::vector<Token>>>(rhs.data, data); break;
            case T_HANDLE:    copyToken<HandleData>(rhs.data, data); break;
            default: ;
        }       
    };

    ~Token()
    {
       deleteData();
    };
};

I would then create a token with

Token newToken(T_INTEGER);
newToken.retreive<long>() = 42;

Now the above code works, but is terribly slow (200% slower than the previous implementation with union). A profiler shows that almost half of the execution time is spent on new and free(). I have tried using placement new syntax on a char data[50] so that space for Token object is allocated on stack when applicable and only once in all cases and that speeds it up a lot but still not as fast as original (about 20% slower).

My question is: How would I go about making this frequent allocation of small objects leaner and quicker?

If this is usually done a whole different way, please advise me how to do it. I generally need a variant type that is robust and fast but not "smart" (automatic conversion, ...) as I have my own framework for that. Generally I would like to minimize the memory allocation cost while also minimizing the required memory.

Thank you for help!

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you just use boost:variant? Also, C++11 relaxes the rules on union. –  Pubby May 1 '12 at 21:01
    
The point is, I don't want to use unionbecause the memory consumption is enormous. As for the boost::variant, I don't really know, will take a look at it. –  Tibor May 1 '12 at 21:05
    
If the boost:variant class does not suits you, I would consider to use some inheritance to avoid switching on types. –  sergico May 1 '12 at 21:07
    
Actually, boost::variant seems to be just the solution I am looking for! I don't know why I overlooked it the last time I checked it. You can post it as answer so I can accept. –  Tibor May 1 '12 at 21:27

1 Answer 1

I know this is years old, and it seems you found your answer but you never posted it so I will explain some solutions if anyone stumbles on this post (like I did).

Union

Yes, the same data structure that you ended up avoiding could have been used. This would reduce the amount of data enormously. Say you have these four types: bool, int, float, and a double. The size of the union will always be the largest which isn't the best, but it's better than the size of all the elements. Now, you said "...I could only use plain-old data structures in the union..." which is true but it can take pointers to non-generic types. This can fix most of your memory problems but if you use pointers you will have to use new and delete so you will still run slower because of these. The other downside to using a union would be that you have to keep track of the type that is being used.

Boost::variant

If you have access to the boost library then I would definitely go with this. I don't think it saves as much memory as a union, but it save a whole lot more than holding all the values. This also allows for non-generic types. Also, you don't have to keep track of which type is being used. All you have to keep track of is the order you wrote the types.

I would say go with the Boost::variant but be possible with the union.

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