Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to know how to vectorize and memoize a custom function in R. It seems my way of thinking is not aligned with R's way of operation. So, I gladly welcome any links to good reading material. For example, R inferno is a nice resource, but it didn't help to figure out memoization in R.

More generally, can you provide a relevant usage example for the memoise or R.cache packages?

I haven't been able to find any other discussions on this subject. Searching for "memoise" or "memoize" on r-bloggers.com returns zero results. Searching for those keywords at http://r-project.markmail.org/ does not return helpful discussions. I emailed the mailing list and did not receive a complete answer.

I am not solely interested in memoizing the GC function, and I am aware of Bioconductor and the various packages available there.

Here's my data:

seqs <- c("","G","C","CCC","T","","TTCCT","","C","CTC")

Some sequences are missing, so they're blank "".

I have a function for calculating GC content:

> GC <- function(s) {
    if (!is.character(s)) return(NA)
    n <- nchar(s)
    if (n == 0) return(NA)
    m <- gregexpr('[GCSgcs]', s)[[1]]
    if (m[1] < 1) return(0)
    return(100.0 * length(m) / n)
}

It works:

> GC('')
[1] NA
> GC('G')
[1] 100
> GC('GAG')
[1] 66.66667
> sapply(seqs, GC)
                  G         C       CCC         T               TTCCT           
       NA 100.00000 100.00000 100.00000   0.00000        NA  40.00000        NA 
        C       CTC 
100.00000  66.66667

I want to memoize it. Then, I want to vectorize it.

Apparently, I must have the wrong mindset for using the memoise or R.cache R packages:

> system.time(dummy <- sapply(rep(seqs,100), GC))
   user  system elapsed
  0.044   0.000   0.054
>
> library(memoise)
> GCm1 <- memoise(GC)
> system.time(dummy <- sapply(rep(seqs,100), GCm1))
   user  system elapsed
  0.164   0.000   0.173
>
> library(R.cache)
> GCm2 <- addMemoization(GC)
> system.time(dummy <- sapply(rep(seqs,100), GCm2))
   user  system elapsed
 10.601   0.252  10.926

Notice that the memoized functions are several orders of magnitude slower.

I tried the hash package, but things seem to be happening behind the scenes and I don't understand the output. The sequence C should have a value of 100, not NULL.

Note that using has.key(s, cache) instead of exists(s, cache) results in the same output. Also, using cache[s] <<- result instead of cache[[s]] <<- result results in the same output.

> cache <- hash()
> GCc <- function(s) {
    if (!is.character(s) || nchar(s) == 0) {
        return(NA)
    }
    if(exists(s, cache)) {
        return(cache[[s]])
    }
    result <- GC(s)
    cache[[s]] <<- result
    return(result)
}
> sapply(seqs,GCc)
[[1]]
[1] NA

$G
[1] 100

$C
NULL

$CCC
[1] 100

$T
NULL

[[6]]
[1] NA

$TTCCT
[1] 40

[[8]]
[1] NA

$C
NULL

$CTC
[1] 66.66667

At least I figured out how to vectorize:

> GCv <- Vectorize(GC)
> GCv(seqs)
                  G         C       CCC         T               TTCCT           
       NA 100.00000 100.00000 100.00000   0.00000        NA  40.00000        NA 
        C       CTC 
100.00000  66.66667 

Relevant stackoverflow posts:

share|improve this question
    
Any particular reason you're disregarding the fact that nchar and gregexpr are already vectorized? –  Joshua Ulrich May 1 '12 at 21:35
add comment

2 Answers

While this won't give you memoization across calls, you can use factors to make individual calls a lot faster if there is a fair bit of repetition. Eg using Joshua's GC2 (though I had to remove fixed=T to get it to work):

GC2 <- function(s) {
  if(!is.character(s)) stop("'s' must be character")
  n <- nchar(s)
  m <- gregexpr('[GCSgcs]', s)
  len <- sapply(m, length)
  neg <- sapply(m, "[[", 1)
  len <- len*(neg > 0)
  100.0 * len/n
}

One can easily define a wrapper like:

GC3 <- function(s) {
  x <- factor(s)
  GC2(levels(x))[x]
}

system.time(GC2(rep(seqs, 50000)))
# user  system elapsed 
# 8.97    0.00    8.99 
system.time(GC3(rep(seqs, 50000)))
# user  system elapsed 
# 0.06    0.00    0.06 
share|improve this answer
    
This is great. Thank you! Memoization will save me a relatively small amount of time from here. –  Kamil Slowikowski May 1 '12 at 23:05
add comment

This doesn't explicitly answer your question, but this function is ~4 times faster than yours.

GC2 <- function(s) {
  if(!is.character(s)) stop("'s' must be character")
  n <- nchar(s)
  m <- gregexpr('[GCSgcs]', s)
  len <- sapply(m, length)
  neg <- sapply(m, "[[", 1)
  len <- len*(neg > 0)
  len/n
}
share|improve this answer
    
On my system (x86_64 linux-gnu R 2.15.0), your function is ~3 times slower. I'm testing the speed like this: system.time(sapply(rep(seqs, 1000), GC)) gets 0.418 elapsed seconds. system.time(sapply(rep(seqs, 1000), GC2)) gets 1.401 elapsed seconds. –  Kamil Slowikowski May 1 '12 at 22:22
    
@KamilSlowikowski That's because you're using the function wrong. Joshua vectorized it, so you should have compared it to GC2(rep(seqs,1000)), in which case it is indeed ~4x faster. –  joran May 1 '12 at 22:28
    
@KamilSlowikowski Although I think he didn't mean to set fixed = TRUE. –  joran May 1 '12 at 22:36
    
Indeed, setting fixed=T results in all of the [[1]] elements being -1. Joshua, thanks for the code! I now know how to take one element out of each item in a list and that 1 * TRUE == 1 and 1 * FALSE == 0. I feel silly now, realizing that nchar and substr work on vectors ("lists") of items, especially because the help ?nchar says so explicitly. –  Kamil Slowikowski May 1 '12 at 22:55
    
@joran: thanks for pointing that out. It was part of my testing because ?gregexpr says using fixed=TRUE can be faster... but it shouldn't have made its way into my answer. –  Joshua Ulrich May 1 '12 at 23:21
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.