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I have a routine that repeatedly builds and rebuilds a big dynamic movieclip full of buttons called "bigList". When it rebuilds, it first attempts to trash bigList so that it doesn't repeatedly add instances of it to the stage (which it was doing for a while).

I have come up with this code which seems to do the trick:

if (bigList.stage)
{
trace("...bigList exists, better trash it");
bigList.parent.removeChild(bigList);
bigList = null;
bigList = new MovieClip();
trace("...done trashing.");
}

It appears to work... what I am concerned about is garbage collection and memory leaks and such. By doing the above, am I PROPERLY getting rid of the old bigList and replacing it anew, or is there going to be data sitting around in memory that I have to deal with?

To add to that, every time it builds bigList, it adds dozens of dynamically generated mc's, each with an event listener to check for clicks. When I trash bigList each time, are all of those instances and listeners sticking around as well?

Do I need to traverse all of the children of bigList and trash them as well, and their listeners? Is there an efficient way to do that, trash a top-level object and all of its sub-objects and listeners, or am I already getting that with the code I have?

Thanks so much!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The great thing about the garbage collection is that it does most of the work for you. All you have to do is guarantee that there's no references to an object, if that is true then the GC will delete the object from memory at it's own pace (you can't force it to empty at your own chosen time).

From your code sample above, you're doing it great, only one small change I would suggest:

if (bigList.stage)
{
    trace("...bigList exists, better trash it");
    this.removeChild(bigList); // "bgList.parent" is the same as using "this"
    bigList = new MovieClip();
    trace("...done trashing.");
}

You don't need to set the variable to null as putting a new MovieClip object into the variable will mean the old object has no reference.

Also, there's no need for the bgList.parent usage as you're already in the parent class. You can even remove the this. to ease readability and reduce clutter but it's good practice to leave it in.

So besides those small recommendations, you're doing a fine job and, based on your sample, you shouldn't have any memory leaks caused by that segment of code.

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Great! Thank you so much for the feedback. And by trashing bigList in this manner it automatically removes all the button instances and event listeners within? –  Mattynabib May 2 '12 at 2:36
    
As long as there's no reference to them which can be better explained as "as long as I can't see them from the highest point". The highest point would be the stage, if the GC can't find a path to that object, anything within the object (providing there isn't a reference to it anywhere else linked to the stage) is removed from memory. Event listeners are tricky. If you use weak references they will always be garbage collected. You can guarantee this by setting the last parameter in the event listener call to true. Example: addEventListener(Event.ENTER_FRAME, myCallBack, 0, true). –  xLite May 2 '12 at 15:41
    
Ignore the 0 unless you want to start learning more advanced techniques regarding events. Although this should be enough understanding for what you're trying to do. –  xLite May 2 '12 at 15:42
    
Is there ever a case in which I would NOT want to use a weak reference with an event listener on a dynamic object? Oh, and it looks as if you need to include the "capturePhase" boolean in there before the Priority and Weak Reference variables as well or it thinks you are trying to coerce a value. –  Mattynabib May 2 '12 at 19:20
    
Woops, yeah you need capturePhase which you would set to the default value of false unless needed otherwise: addEventListener(Event.ENTER_FRAME, myCallback, false, 0, true). The weak reference only really concerns dynamic functions created at runtime with the class type Function. You can check out more about it in the Adobe docs. If you don't make it a weak reference, it could cause the function to stay in memory even if it's not used anymore. Otherwise it's just there as good practice. –  xLite May 3 '12 at 19:14

Adding onto xLite's answer, you can use System.gc() while debugging to force the garbage collection process and check if you've been removing references properly - generally by checking the total RAM usage immediately afterward via System.totalMemoryNumber.

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Thank you! I wonder why you can't implement gc at runtime. –  Mattynabib May 2 '12 at 2:37
1  
@Mattynabib Garbage collection I imagine is very a time consuming task (hence why it only runs when Flash Player thinks it's required). I foresee many inexperienced developers spamming the forced garbage collection and wondering why the performance of their application is so terrible. –  Marty May 2 '12 at 2:47

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