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What's the best way to query a total price?

I want to multiply several rows of data by a certain amount and display their individual totals in a new column in £'s in my database?

What syntax do I need?

Edit:

I have loads of customers. Some have only one order, some multiple orders. I want to start charging them £1.50 per order, therefore, I need x(times) the order amount by £1.50 and display it in a new column in £. E.g customers with 4 order would need to be x £1.50 which would display £6.00 in column 3 and so on... 1.st column is name, second column is order amount. 3rd column needs to be total price. Hope that makes sense

Update from comments: It's counted the orders, however it's returning BLOB values in the 3rd column where I want to display £ values for the * calculation of orders:

 SELECT   CONCAT_WS(" "
              , c.customer_title
              , c.customer_fname
              , c.customer_sname
           ) AS Customer
          , COUNT(O.order_name) AS Ordertotal
          , concat('£' * 1.5) TotalPrice 
 FROM   Order O, Friend F, Customer C, FriendOrder 
 WHERE C.customer_id = F.Customer_id 
 AND   F.Friend_id = FriendOrder.friend_id 
 AND   O.order_id = FriendOrder.order_id 
 GROUP BY Customer 
 ORDER BY C.customer_sname, C.customer_fname 
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3  
What data are we talking about? What column types? –  dweiss May 1 '12 at 21:42
    
I have loads of customers. Some have only one order, some multiple orders. I want to start charging them £1.50 per order, therefore, I need x(times) the order amount by £1.50 and display it in a new column in £. E.g customers with 4 order would need to be x £1.50 which would display £6.00 in column 3 and so on... 1.st column is name, second column is order amount. 3rd column needs to be total price. Hope that makes sense –  user1335184 May 1 '12 at 21:50
    
@user1335184 - Welcome to stackoverflow. That's a good description of the goal. The only thing missing is your table structure (ie columns and data types) and possibly some sample data. You can update your question to add more details. The more accurate the details are, the more accurate the answers will be :) –  Leigh May 2 '12 at 1:10
    
Thanks @Leigh however, so far I have this, it's counted the orders, however it's returning 'BLOB' values in the 3rd column where I want to display £ values for the * calculation of orders: SELECT CONCAT_WS(" ", c.customer_title, c.customer_fname, c.customer_sname) AS Customer, COUNT(O.order_name) AS Ordertotal, concat('£' * 1.5) TotalPrice FROM Order O, Friend F, Customer C, FriendOrder WHERE C.customer_id = F.Customer_id AND F.Friend_id = FriendOrder.friend_id AND O.order_id = FriendOrder.order_id GROUP BY Customer ORDER BY C.customer_sname, C.customer_fname –  user1335184 May 2 '12 at 22:13
    
any ideads @dweiss –  user1335184 May 2 '12 at 22:27
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3 Answers

It is a best practice to separate tasks, leaving computation to the SQL programming, and presentation to whatever programming language you use for the front end.

So your SQL should use it's native * operator. Your query might look like:

SELECT `column_1` * `column_2` as `product`;

this would return the product of two columns in a column named 'product'.

The £ sign is formatting. You should leave that to whatever architecture you have written for presenting the information. (PHP or java for example)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your input. BUT... I want to do Sums, and start charging customers by multiplying their orders numbers by £1.50 each time, and display that total price in a 3rd column.... That's why I need to display a 3rd column to show this amount from my query... –  user1335184 May 1 '12 at 22:00
    
Yes, pardon me, I started the post before your above comment. –  GRY May 1 '12 at 22:04
    
Hope this is more helpful. SELECT COUNT(*) * 1.5 as total FROM customers where customer_number='(some #)'; –  GRY May 1 '12 at 22:10
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Applying a lot of imagination because of the lack of description of your data and fields, this should do the trick:

select c.name, count(*) orderAmount, concat('£', count(*) * 1.5) totalPrice
from customers c
join orders o on c.customerId = o.customerId
group by c.customerId, c.name
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @GRY however, so far I have this, it's counted the orders, however it's returning 'BLOB' values in the 3rd column where I want to display £ values for the * calculation of orders: SELECT CONCAT_WS(" ", c.customer_title, c.customer_fname, c.customer_sname) AS Customer, COUNT(O.order_name) AS Ordertotal, concat('£' * 1.5) TotalPrice FROM Order O, Friend F, Customer C, FriendOrder WHERE C.customer_id = F.Customer_id AND F.Friend_id = FriendOrder.friend_id AND O.order_id = FriendOrder.order_id GROUP BY Customer ORDER BY C.customer_sname, C.customer_fname –  user1335184 May 2 '12 at 22:13
    
any ideas @Mosty Mostacho ? –  user1335184 May 2 '12 at 22:28
    
@user1335184 As I wrote in the answer, don't use concat('£' * 1.5). Use concat('£', count(*) * 1.5). –  Mosty Mostacho May 3 '12 at 0:19
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You shouldn't add the answer to the original question, since this makes finding out the question confusing.

It looks like everything was answered except the blob part -- here is the final result:

SELECT
    CONCAT_WS(
        " ",
        c.customer_title,
        c.customer_fname,
        c.customer_sname
    ) AS Customer,
    COUNT(*) AS Ordertotal,
    CONCAT('£', cast(count(*) * 1.5 as char)) AS TotalPrice 
FROM Order O
INNER JOIN FriendOrder fo
ON O.order_id = fo.order_id
INNER JOIN Friend F
ON fo.friend_id = F.Friend_id
INNER JOIN Customer C
ON F.Customer_id = C.customer_id
GROUP BY Customer 
ORDER BY C.customer_sname, C.customer_fname 

To avoid the 'blobs', cast to char since you are creating a display string. Here is the snippet from the query:

cast(count(*) * 1.5 as char)
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