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My struct is as follows:

struct Candidate { 
    float pertotal, voteper; 
    string name; 
    int voten, votem, votese, votesw, total;
};

and I need to assign a null value to name. I have tried:

struct Candidate { 
    float pertotal, voteper; 
    string name = 0; 
    int voten, votem, votese, votesw, total;
};

and

struct Candidate { 
    float pertotal, voteper; 
    string name = ""; 
    int voten, votem, votese, votesw, total;
};

but it doesn't seem to like it.. Ideas?

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The answer regarding "type not instance" is correct, but it's also worth pointing out that std::string is an object not a pointer, so you can't set it to NULL, only to a value such as "". –  Benj May 1 '12 at 22:00
1  
Note that the last solution works fine with C++11 (you'll need an up-to-date compiler like GCC 4.7 though). –  Morwenn May 1 '12 at 22:06

2 Answers 2

std::string is default-constructed to be empty, so you don't need to do anything.

If you need to put something else in it (when an object of that class is created) though, you need a constructor.

If you've already created an instance:

Candidate c;

And you want to set the string back to an empty string, just assign to it:

c.name = "";
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I sort of want to reset it. I am testing if the string is a letter, if it isn't it throws up an error. When a correct value is entered the code continues. But when I call upon the name string it still has the number value inside it. –  blanksby May 1 '12 at 22:00
1  
@blanksby oh, if you want to reset it to an empty string, just assign to it: Candidate c; /* do stuff */ c.name = ""; –  Seth Carnegie May 1 '12 at 22:01
    
Or c.clear();... –  Tony D May 1 '12 at 22:04
    
And is that assigned outside of the struct? –  blanksby May 1 '12 at 22:06
    
@blanksby yes, it's done on an object-by-object bases; you have to create an instance of it and then you can reset it. –  Seth Carnegie May 1 '12 at 22:09

Candidate is a type, not an instance.

You can do this, however:

Candidate cand;

cand.name = "";

Alternatively, you could write a constructor:

struct Candidate {
    Candidate() : name("") {}

    ...
};

However, you don't need to do either of these in this case, because the default constructor of std::string results in an empty string.

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