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I know 2 places where the class keyword is used in c#.

  1. In class declaration
  2. In generic constrains (class GenericClass where T : class)

But is there anything I've missed? It's importan to me, becouse I'm writing a program wich counts classes in a file. Can find no info in msdn or C# specification.

Edit

#if class
partial class C<T> where T : class
{
    // class!
    int @class = 123;
    string c = "class";
}
partial class C<T> where T : class {}
#else
partial class D {}
partial class D {}
partial class D {}
#endif

This is accumulation of several answers.

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2  
"class" is also usable as variable names (@class) as well as in string which I'm sure you already know. –  Joshua Enfield May 1 '12 at 22:30
2  
You would get a more reliable count by using reflection against the assemblies, but this might be what you are looking for if you are analysing the source. –  benPearce May 1 '12 at 22:33
3  
You could use the visual studio extension APIs to count classes. It's probably better at it than you are. –  Dan-o May 1 '12 at 22:34
2  
What kind of "file"? A .cs source file? A compiled DLL? –  Dour High Arch May 1 '12 at 22:35
2  
May be you have some partial classes and this causes to counting them two times. –  Saeed Amiri May 1 '12 at 22:43

6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Just counting occurences of "class" does not tell you how many classes are in a file:

#if FOO
partial class C 
{
    // class!
    int @class = 123;
    string c = "class";
}
partial class C {}
#else
partial class D {}
partial class D {}
partial class D {}
#endif

The string "class" appears eight times in there, but the file only defines a single class.

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@EricLippert Well, the question is not about how to solve the problem. Partial classes is not a big problem. I can use stack and build names depends on namespaces, classes and nested classes. Is there any other places where keyword class can be used in C#? –  er-v May 1 '12 at 23:07

You might want to use something like ANTLR ( http://www.antlr.org/ ) and use for example something similar to this SO post Partial grammar for counting class count . I think it is safer than trying to write your own parser.

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It's also possible to use class as an identifier by preceding it with an "at" sign.

int @class = 1;

I'm not saying it's advisable to write that, but you might want to consider it if you're trying to count classes.

Related

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2  
finally i know how to give my variables the name @var and @param! –  thumbmunkeys May 1 '12 at 22:31
1  
I know it, but keyword class is not used here. Just the word class is used ) –  er-v May 1 '12 at 22:33
    
Note that this is not only for variables but for any identifier. –  Stilgar May 1 '12 at 22:34
    
@Stilgar: Yes, thanks. I've updated my answer. –  Mark Byers May 1 '12 at 22:35
1  
@er-v: Yes, it is. Read the grammar that is fully specified in the, wouldn't you know, specification. –  Jason May 2 '12 at 0:17

It seems that you can have class defined as a compilation conditional symbol, e.g.

#if class
#else
#endif

...and it compiles if you define it in the project properties / build.

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Can't think of any other usage but remember that you can use keywords as identifiers if they are prefixed with @

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It's possible to use the keyword class in a generic method definition:

foo<T>(T object) where T:class

Use object, if you want to be able to pass y as anything:

foo(string x, class y) { }
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1  
foo(string x, class y) { } - does not compile, am I doing something wrong? –  er-v May 1 '12 at 22:51
    
Perhaps some compilers don't allow this. –  Lion May 1 '12 at 23:28
    
I could find the same thing also discussed here. –  Lion May 1 '12 at 23:33
1  
@Lion, or perhaps all compilers don't allow this. –  svick May 1 '12 at 23:39

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