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Shouldn't functions within a namespace only be accessible via using the namespace scoping or by the using directive?

I am having a problem where certain functions, defined inside of a namespace, are accessible OUTSIDE of that namespace. I believe there should be a compiler error, but I am not getting one across the three different compilers I have tried (VS.NET 2003, VS2010 and GCC 4).

Here is the code:

namespace N{
  typedef struct _some_type *some_type;
  struct some_struct { int x; };
  void A(void);
  void B(int);
  void C(some_type*);
  void D(some_type);
  void E(struct some_struct);
}

using N::some_type;
using N::some_struct;

void TestFunction()
{
  some_type foo;
  some_struct s;

  N::A();         //should compile (and does on VS2003, VS2010, and GCC 4.1.2)
  ::A();          //shouldn't compile (and doesn't on VS2003, VS2010, and GCC 4.1.2)
  A();            //shouldn't compile (and doesn't on VS2003, VS2010, and GCC 4.1.2)

  N::B(0);        //should compile (and does on VS2003, VS2010, and GCC 4.1.2)
  ::B(0);         //shouldn't compile (and doesn't on VS2003, VS2010, and GCC 4.1.2)
  B(0);           //shouldn't compile (and doesn't on VS2003, VS2010, and GCC 4.1.2)

  N::C(&foo);     //should compile (and does on VS2003, VS2010, and GCC 4.1.2)
  ::C(&foo);      //shouldn't compile (and doesn't on VS2003, VS2010, and GCC 4.1.2)
  C(&foo);        //shouldn't compile (but does on VS2003, VS2010, and GCC 4.1.2) -- problem!

  N::D(foo);      //should compile (and does on VS2003, VS2010, and GCC 4.1.2)
  ::D(foo);       //shouldn't compile (and doesn't on VS2003, VS2010, and GCC 4.1.2)
  D(foo);         //shouldn't compile (but does on VS2003, VS2010, and GCC 4.1.2) -- problem!

  N::E(s);        //should compile (and does on VS2003, VS2010, and GCC 4.1.2)
  ::E(s);         //shouldn't compile (and doesn't on VS2003, VS2010, and GCC 4.1.2)
  E(s);           //shouldn't compile (but does on VS2003, VS2010, and GCC 4.1.2) -- problem!
}

None of the functions should be accessible without using the N:: prefix, but C, D, and E are for some unknown reason. I initially thought it was a compiler bug, but because I am seeing this across multiple compilers it makes me question what is going on.

share|improve this question
    
I thought this was an "old-compiler bug", but that also compiles on gcc 4.6. –  mfontanini May 1 '12 at 23:18
    
My best guess is the fact that you have these lines: using N::some_type; and using N::some_struct; and the return types of C, D, and E are those types. –  gcochard May 1 '12 at 23:19
    
Greg, you can remove the usings and it still happens. Also the return types of all of the functions are void. –  syplex May 1 '12 at 23:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I think you're seeing the effect of Koenig lookup. In your example, foo and s are types defined in namespace N. Your calls to routines C, D, and E use arguments of those types, so namespace N is searched in order to resolve those function calls.

share|improve this answer
2  
Side note: Adding parentheses, i.e. (C)(&foo) will prevent argument-dependent lookup. –  Jesse Good May 1 '12 at 23:27
    
Well, you are correct. It is in section 3.4.2 of the 2003 C++ spec. I happen to disagree with this part of the spec and think it was ill-conceived, but there it is. Does anyone know if there is a way to force a more strict namespace scoping in GCC or VC++? –  syplex May 1 '12 at 23:39
    
@syplex In fact it's extremely useful for properly looking up free-functions based on the argument types inside templates. I don't think g++ offers such an option as it would go against what's required by the standard. What's the real problem you're trying to solve here? –  Mark B May 1 '12 at 23:50
    
@Mark B I don't see why you couldn't properly scope the namespace in that case or include a using directive. –  syplex May 2 '12 at 0:23
1  
@syplex You might not know the correct namespace (e.g., in template code or if using a typedef). –  Josh May 2 '12 at 0:26

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