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Based on the answers below : It is Still not clear to me: What does the synchronized construct on the concurrentMap do, if anything. i.e. in the case of a concurrentmap, what is the difference if any between synchronized(map) versus non synchronizing. I am not interested in the correctness or believed goodness of the solution. Just an answer to the question: Q:What is the difference between synchronizing on a concurrentmap and not synchronizing on the same? Specifically with regard to performance.. will suffice. Nothing more please.
I am only interested in what happens and no supplementary advice.

I have a theoretical question which I am having a bit of a mental problem resolving: Assume I have a Concurrent Collection class say=>ConcurrentHashMap map;

Assume I have three methods:

method1: synchronized(map){
       doSomethingWithThemap(); //Assume put integers 1.. 1000000
}

method2:doSomethingWithThemap(); //Note it is not synchronized 
method3:doSomethingElseWithThemap(); //Assume put integers 2000000.. 3000000

Now assume 2 TestCases:


  • TestCase1: Spawn two threads A & B. A calls method1 and B calls method3.
  • TestCase2: Spawn two threads A' & B'. A' calls method2 and B' calls method3.

From a performance point of view I would expect TestCase2 to win, since from what I understand, in TestCase1 B cannot add to the map, albeit concurrent, since the synchronized block will hold the lock on the map, and this is not the case in TestCase2.

My Unit Tests DO NOT validate this hypothesis.

Q: What am I missing here. i.e. Given a synchronized block on a concurrentcollection is performance impacted at all?

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method1 puts 1 million integers into the map, and method2 does what? –  esej May 2 '12 at 0:07
    
Exactly the same thing in a non synchronized block. –  Olivier Twist May 2 '12 at 0:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Q: What am I missing here.

Your assumption that ConcurrentHashMap internally synchronizes on itself is not correct: according to the source code, the implementation uses java.util.concurrent.locks objects, instances of which are hidden inside the collection, so you cannot lock/synchronize on them.

In general, this is a recommendation that writers of class libraries should follow: if you need to synchronize on an object, do not synchronize on this; create a private object inside your class, and synchronize on that object instead. Otherwise, you may be facing concurrency issues caused by others synchronized on your object, and holding the lock indefinitely.

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The point of ConcurrentHashMap is that it doesn't have a single global lock you have to hold to work with the map -- that you can have many threads writing and reading from it concurrently. That's why it's preferable to Hashtable and Maps.synchronizedMap(HashMap). –  Louis Wasserman May 2 '12 at 0:15
    
Still not clear to me: What does the synchronized construct on the concurrentMap do, if anything. i.e. in the case of a concurrentmap, what is the difference if any between synchronized(map) versus non synchronizing. <b><i>I am not interested in the correctness or believed goodness of the solution</i></b>. I am interested in what it does. –  Olivier Twist May 2 '12 at 0:39
    
@OlivierTwist In your case, it does nothing, because your thread is the only one synchronizing on it. concurrentMap synchronizes on something else, which is internal to the implementation. If you had other threads synchronizing on concurrentMap, only one of these threads would be executing its synchronized block. However, you could as well synchronize on any other non-null object; the fact that it is your concurrentMap is completely irrelevant. –  dasblinkenlight May 2 '12 at 0:44
    
@dasblinkenlight care to elaborate on that.. A pithy example would be nice:-) –  Olivier Twist May 2 '12 at 0:47
    
@dasblinkenlight I think I "kinda" understand your last statement. In the documentation for synchronized keyword it says: When one thread is executing a synchronized method for an object, all other threads that invoke synchronized methods for the same object block (suspend execution) until the first thread is done with the object. So in my mind if two or more threads were calling method1 followed by method3, there should be a performance impact, relative to the case where the same number of threads called method2 followed by method3? Is that correct? –  Olivier Twist May 2 '12 at 0:57

You have no guarantee that ConcurrentHashMap uses its instance as a monitor. It may very use some other object to lock on!

private Object lock = new Object();

synchronized(lock) {
   // do some stuff - you can't get my lock because it is private
}

It is even possible that ConcurrentHashMap doesn't use locks, but rather some other concurrency primitives like compare-and-set, semaphores, etc.

Locks in Java are reentrant, so if you already hold a lock, you won't block yourself.

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ConcurrentHashMap is not using synchronized... Still thread safe though, but get calls for example are not locking anything. Concurrent datastructures are quite nice and interesting. Well it does use some internal locking under certain circumstances but not anything that is exposed, and certainly not exposing the object's monitor itself.

By the way. Measuring concurrent code performance like this is rather tricky and will vary from run to run and computer, but is mostly flawed anyway.

But otherwise it could theoretically work as you describe if you use a synchronized hashmap instead. Collections.synchronizedMap(yourMap);

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What does the synchronized construct on the concurrentMap do, if anything

It merely wastes time and space. ConcurrentMap already embodies alternative means of dealing with concurrency.

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