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I was wondering if anyone can help me understanding the Ruby code below? I'm pretty new to Ruby programming and having trouble understanding the meaning of each functions.

When I run this with my twitter username and password as parameter, I get a stream of twitter feed samples. What do I need to do with this code to only display the hashtags?

I'm trying to gather the hashtags every 30 seconds, then sort from least to most occurrences of the hashtags.

Not looking for solutions, but for ideas. Thanks!

require 'eventmachine'
require 'em-http'
require 'json'

usage = "#{$0} <user> <password>"
abort usage unless user = ARGV.shift
abort usage unless password = ARGV.shift

url = 'https://stream.twitter.com/1/statuses/sample.json'

def handle_tweet(tweet)
  return unless tweet['text']
  puts "#{tweet['user']['screen_name']}: #{tweet['text']}"
end

EventMachine.run do
  http = EventMachine::HttpRequest.new(url).get :head => { 'Authorization' => [ user, password ] }

  buffer = ""

  http.stream do |chunk|
    buffer += chunk
    while line = buffer.slice!(/.+\r?\n/)
      handle_tweet JSON.parse(line)
    end
  end
end
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2  
Is this question about Ruby, or is it about the Twitter API? Do you not get how to get the hash tags from the API, or do you not understand the Ruby code that's calling the API? –  jefflunt May 2 '12 at 1:27
    
it's both. I need to understand how the Ruby code works first, in order to figure out how to modify the code to get the hashtags. –  fokusfocus May 2 '12 at 1:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
puts "#{tweet['user']['screen_name']}: #{tweet['text']}"

That line shows you a user name followed by the content of the tweet.

Let's take a step back for a sec.

Hash tags appear inside the tweet's content--this means they're inside tweet['text']. A hash tag always takes the form of a # followed by a bunch of non-space characters. That's really easy to grab with a regex. Ruby's core API facilitates that via String#scan. Example:

"twitter is short #foo yawn #bar".scan(/\#\w+/) # => ["#foo", "#bar"]

What you want is something like this:

def handle_tweet(tweet)
  return unless tweet['text']
  # puts "#{tweet['user']['screen_name']}: #{tweet['text']}" # OLD
  puts tweet['text'].scan(/\#\w+/).to_s
end

tweet['text'].scan(/#\w+/) is an array of strings. You can do whatever you want with that array. Supposing you're new to Ruby and want to print the hash tags to the console, here's a brief note about printing arrays with puts:

puts array      # => "#foo\n#bar"
puts array.to_s # => '["#foo", "#bar"]'
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thanks! I'm beginning to understand now... I have some more questions though: so tweet is a parameter of handle_tweet. but how does tweet['user']['screen_name'] returns user name and tweet['text'] return content of tweet? also, where does .to_s come from? –  fokusfocus May 2 '12 at 2:12
    
ok another question... whenever I try to run this code, it keeps printing the twitter stream endlessly... what is a good way to break the loop and exit to the command prompt? I'm using terminal in mac –  fokusfocus May 2 '12 at 3:05
    
Right, tweet is a parameter of handle_tweet. tweet['user'] implies that tweet's type is a Hash or Set. You can use "puts tweet.class" inside of your function to identify tweet's class. So, the code calls tweet['user']['screen_name'], which implies that tweet['user'] is probably ALSO a hash, and that the two are nested like Matryoshka dolls. –  Wayland Smith May 3 '12 at 2:55
    
Can't help you with the Mac stuff. If you want to only print a couple and quit, you can just use a counter and keep track of how many times you've printed, then break/return. You may find ruby.learncodethehardway.org/book/ex33.html and ruby.learncodethehardway.org/book/ex32.html helpful for understanding loops in Ruby. –  Wayland Smith May 3 '12 at 2:57
#Load Libraries
require 'eventmachine'
require 'em-http'
require 'json'


# Looks like this section assumes you're calling this from commandline.
usage = "#{$0} <user> <password>"  # $0 returns the name of the program
abort usage unless user = ARGV.shift  # Return first argument passed when program called
abort usage unless password = ARGV.shift

# The URL
url = 'https://stream.twitter.com/1/statuses/sample.json'

# method which, when called later, prints out the tweets
def handle_tweet(tweet)
  return unless tweet['text']  # Ensures tweet object has 'text' property
  puts "#{tweet['user']['screen_name']}: #{tweet['text']}"  # write the result
end

# Create an HTTP request obj to URL above with user authorization
EventMachine.run do
  http = EventMachine::HttpRequest.new(url).get :head => { 'Authorization' => [ user, password ] }

  # Initiate an empty string for the buffer
  buffer = ""

  # Read the stream by line
  http.stream do |chunk|
    buffer += chunk
    while line = buffer.slice!(/.+\r?\n/)  # cut each line at newline
      handle_tweet JSON.parse(line)   # send each tweet object to handle_tweet method
    end
  end
end

Here's a commented version of what the source is doing. If you just want the hashtag, you'll want to rewrite handle_tweet to something like this:

handle_tweet(tweet)
  tweet.scan(/#\w/) do |tag|
    puts tag
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
thanks! I still don't understand this code though # Read the stream by line http.stream do |chunk| buffer += chunk while line = buffer.slice!(/.+\r?\n/) # cut each line at newline handle_tweet JSON.parse(line) # send each tweet object to handle_tweet method end what does JSON.parse(line) means? –  fokusfocus May 2 '12 at 3:06
    
The URL at the top is a RESTful web service. When you send your HTTP request using EventMachine, the web services responds with text in the form of JSON (JavaScript Object Notation). JSON.parse takes the JSON formatted text and converts it into ruby objects, which is why you're able to have a tweet object with text and user properties. Essentially, it's just converting JS objects into Ruby objects so you can work with them instead of having to parse text yourself. –  andrewheins May 2 '12 at 13:20

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