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The hex chars are in the form of <9F>. There's lots of data around them, but I am only interested in getting the regex right so I can remove these from a table with sed and then re-import the database.

Here's what I've tried so far:

egrep -io '\<[0-9A-Fa-f]{2}\>' /root/database.sql

And several variations. I can't seem to get it to work, and I'm not sure why. I've tried double/triple escaping and grouping as well. It finds the character pair, but doesn't find the < >'s

So it gives output like this:

39
48
69
6F
B9

but I need it to get the full

<39>
<48>
<69>
<6F>
<B9>
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3 Answers 3

I'm betting that these are bytes outside the range your terminal can display (either control characters or multibyte strings).

First I have to ask if you are absolutely certain that you want to clean this out of the data abase (after all someone might have rally wanted to insert a record with the word 'über' or something). Also, I have seen some databases use control characters as separaters in DB dump files, as well (Ingres comes to mind)

If you still want to scrub the data then maybe try this:

perl -npe 'tr/\001-\177/cd'

I'm typing this on a tablet so I can't double check, but that should delete any characters outside the 7-bit ASCII range.

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This works for me:

$cat testfile
<39> <48>
<60><6F><a4>

$egrep -io '<[0-9A-Fa-f]{2}>' testfile

<39>
<48>
<60>
<6F>
<a4>
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that's very strange, it works for me on the test file but not in the database file, so I have to assume that the actual data in the db is not how it appears when I view it with "less" or "vim". –  Paul Cravey May 2 '12 at 2:24
1  
You can try od -xa filename | less to view the hex and ascii contents of the file. That may give you a better idea of its contents. Also, file filename will tell you what linux thinks is in the file. –  Adam Liss May 2 '12 at 2:25
1  
Oh, and don't log in as root when you're experimenting. Don't run with scissors, always wear sunscreen, and put on a sweater--I'm cold. :-) –  Adam Liss May 2 '12 at 2:31
    
It looks like the issue is related to UTF-8 in the database data: fileformat.info/info/unicode/utf8.htm <E2><80><99> shows up in the db often as well as <C2><B1> and a few others. I'm trying to clean out the bad data, but I can't seem to work with it in any way that will clean the whole db. –  Paul Cravey May 2 '12 at 8:05
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Escaping the less than and greater than signs makes the match look for beginning of word and end of word boundaries. If you want to match those literal characters then use them unescaped.

Also, you can simplify your regex by using a character class.

grep -E '<[[:xdigit:]]{2}>'

It's possible that you have other non-printing characters that aren't being matched. As Adam suggested, use od or hexdump to see what else may be hiding. Binary files are sometimes represented for output using, e.g., <EF> without those characters actually being there. What is there would be a byte having the value 0xEF. Binary data like that won't work well with sed or grep.

share|improve this answer
    
It looks like the issue is related to UTF-8 in the database data: fileformat.info/info/unicode/utf8.htm <E2><80><99> shows up in the db often as well as <C2><B1> and a few others. I'm trying to clean out the bad data, but I can't seem to work with it in any way that will clean the whole db. –  Paul Cravey May 2 '12 at 8:04
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