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I have a text file and I'm trying to replace a specific character (.) in the first column to another character (-). Every field is delimited by comma. Some of the lines have the last 3 columns empty, so they have 3 commas at the end.

Example of text file:

abc.def.ghi,123.4561.789,ABC,DEF,GHI
abc.def.ghq,124.4562.789,ABC,DEF,GHI
abc.def.ghw,125.4563.789,ABC,DEF,GHI
abc.def.ghe,126.4564.789,,,
abc.def.ghr,127.4565.789,,,

What I tried was using awk to replace '.' in the first column with '-', then print out the contents.

ETA: Tried out sarnold's suggestion and got the output I want.

ETA2: I could have a longer first column. Is there a way to change ONLY the first 3 '.' in the first column to '-', so I get the output

abc-def-ghi-qqq.www,123.4561.789,ABC,DEF,GHI
abc-def-ghq-qqq.www,124.4562.789,ABC,DEF,GHI
abc-def-ghw-qqq.www,125.4563.789,ABC,DEF,GHI
abc-def-ghe-qqq.www,126.4564.789,,,
abc-def-ghr-qqq.www,127.4565.789,,,
share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

. is regexp notation for "any character". Escape it with \ and it means .:

$ awk -F, '{gsub(/\./,"-",$1); print}' textfile.csv 
abc-def-ghi 123.4561.789 ABC DEF GHI
abc-def-ghq 124.4562.789 ABC DEF GHI
abc-def-ghw 125.4563.789 ABC DEF GHI
abc-def-ghe 126.4564.789   
abc-def-ghr 127.4565.789   
$ 

The output field separator is a space, by default. Set OFS = "," to set that:

$ awk  -F, 'BEGIN {OFS=","} {gsub(/\./,"-",$1); print}' textfile.csv 
abc-def-ghi,123.4561.789,ABC,DEF,GHI
abc-def-ghq,124.4562.789,ABC,DEF,GHI
abc-def-ghw,125.4563.789,ABC,DEF,GHI
abc-def-ghe,126.4564.789,,,
abc-def-ghr,127.4565.789,,,

This still allows changing multiple fields:

$ awk  -F, 'BEGIN {OFS=","} {gsub(/\./,"-",$1); gsub("1", "#",$2); print}' textfile.csv 
abc-def-ghi,#23.456#.789,ABC,DEF,GHI
abc-def-ghq,#24.4562.789,ABC,DEF,GHI
abc-def-ghw,#25.4563.789,ABC,DEF,GHI
abc-def-ghe,#26.4564.789,,,
abc-def-ghr,#27.4565.789,,,

I don't know what -OFS, does, but it isn't a supported command line option; using it to set the output field separator was a mistake on my part. Setting OFS within the awk program works well.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I tried out your suggestion and have added it to my original post. – Rayne May 2 '12 at 2:48
    
Hunh, why did adding -OFS, actually change the output for the second column too? – sarnold May 2 '12 at 2:53
    
Hmm, I don't know, but I got the output I wanted and the second column wasn't changed. – Rayne May 2 '12 at 2:55
    
Why is it that with -OFS, my $1 is the entire line? I'm now trying to change $2, but can't do that. – Rayne May 2 '12 at 3:12
    
Sorry, I don't know why I thought adding -OFS would work; I can't find the bit in the manual that led me down that path, but if you set the variable in the awk script itself, it works as expected. – sarnold May 2 '12 at 5:46

This might work for you:

awk -F, -vOFS=, '{for(n=1;n<=3;n++)sub(/\./,"-",$1)}1' file
abc-def-ghi-qqq.www,123.4561.789,ABC,DEF,GHI
abc-def-ghq-qqq.www,124.4562.789,ABC,DEF,GHI
abc-def-ghw-qqq.www,125.4563.789,ABC,DEF,GHI
abc-def-ghe-qqq.www,126.4564.789,,,
abc-def-ghr-qqq.www,127.4565.789,,,
share|improve this answer

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