Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wrote a program that accepts a character of input and outputs that character, like this

int ch = getchar();
printf("%c", ch);

It worked like I expected. Then I decided to be welcoming and print Hello first.

printf("Hello!\n");
int ch = getchar();
printf("%c", ch);

To my surprise, this caused the compiler to throw two errors:

error C2065: 'ch' : undeclared identifier
error C2143: syntax error : missing ';' before 'type'

I didn't see why adding the first line would cause that to happen. Anyway, I refactored the program to get rid of the int declaration and the errors magically disappeared.

printf("Hello!\n");
printf("%c", getchar());

What's going on? What's the magic that causes these errors to appear and then disappear?

share|improve this question
1  
What compiler are you using? This code works error free on gcc 4.4.3. –  Adam Cadien May 2 '12 at 2:45
    
@AdamCadien I'm using whatever version of MSVC that ships with Visual Studio 2010. –  Peter Olson May 2 '12 at 2:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Creating new variables after the start of a block was not allowed in C89 standard but is allowed in the newer C99 standard.

You are using a older compiler or a compiler not fully compliant to c99.
Your code example should work as is on any good compiler. Works on gcc-4.3.4


Alternate Solutions:

You can get rid of the problems in two ways:
Declare the variable at the begining of the block:

int ch;
printf("Hello!\n");
ch = getchar();
printf("%c", ch);

Or

Create a new block for declaring the variable:

printf("Hello!\n");
{ 
    int ch = getchar();
    printf("%c", ch);
}

Suggestion:

You should really change your compiler because if i remember correctly gcc supported this as compiler extension even prior to c99.

share|improve this answer

If you're using an older c compiler , you have to make all variable declarations BEFORE anything else. Try:

int ch;
printf("Hello!\n");
ch = getchar();
printf("%c", ch);
share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, C compilers before about 1985 required any variable declarations to be first in a scope ({}) before any executable statements. If there is still a compiler doing this, it is easily replaced for any fine free compiler, such as gcc. –  wallyk May 2 '12 at 2:46
    
Oh, so does the Visual Studio C compiler not support C99 features? –  Peter Olson May 2 '12 at 2:47
    
@PeterOlson: It should. It would take a very old MSC version to given such an error. Maybe there was something else wrong, like a missing semicolon? –  wallyk May 2 '12 at 2:48
    
@wallyk: I thought MS was very reluctant to adopt C99 because more of its developers use C++ and preferred an adoption of C++11. –  dreamlax May 2 '12 at 2:50
1  
Microsoft Visual C supports ANSI C89, not C99. You have to put declarations at the beginning of the function/block. Sorry. –  librik May 2 '12 at 4:35

Versions of C prior to C99 did not allow “mixed declarations and code”, meaning you had to declare all of your variables at the beginning of the scope. Modern-day C compilers allow mixed declarations and code, as do C++ compilers. Some non-C99 compilers even allow it as an extension.

I assume this was to make it easier for a compiler to determine how much space would actually be required on the stack, or something along those lines.

share|improve this answer

Probably, you are using an pretty old C compiler. Probably one with C89 support. Using so forces you to declare any variable before anything within a block, (eg an function or main) Two ways out: Declare ch first:

int ch = getchar();
printf("Hello!\n");
printf("%c", ch);

or, even better, try changing your compiler. What OS are you using? Windows? Linux? Mac?

Also, a quick note. You are using getchar to get an integer number.

Try using, instead of getchar, scanf("%d", &ch). Or, if you really needs to use getchar, and to print it as a char, declare ch as a char itself, and, if you need to use it as an integer again, use the itoa function, that transforms a char to an integer.

share|improve this answer
    
This answer doesn't make any sense, getchar() returns int, so it makes sense for ch to be int. Also, you don't need to use itoa() to convert int to char. –  dreamlax May 2 '12 at 7:20
    
I think you did not understood what i meant by using itoa(). If he REALLY NEEDS (for some reason within the code) to use ch as as char, instead of as an int, he can use itoa() to transform the char back to an integer. –  Arthur Camara Jul 18 '12 at 1:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.