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I'm not a programmer, but I've been trying to do some perl regex's and have hit the wall. I was hoping to find some assistance, I'm trying to do some data analysis of a log file and I'm running into the following problem:

I have a file, test.csv, that is comprised of multiple single line entries from another program that produces the following layout format:

  • d:\snow\dir.txt
  • d:\snow\history\dir.tff
  • d:\snow\history\help.jar
  • d:\winter\show\help.txt
  • d:\summer\beach\ocean\swimming.txt

What I want would like to do is delete the file names from the path listing, so the resulting file would contain:

  • d:\snow\
  • d:\snow\history\
  • d:\snow\history\
  • d:\winter\show\
  • d:\summer\beach\ocean\

I've banged my head against the wall on this one and have tried various perl regex's in an attempt to drop the file names out without much luck. Since the paths to the directories are of varying length, I'm hitting a wall, I'm not sure if this is something that I can do within perl or python.

Any ideas on how to

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4 Answers 4

You can do this with one line in Perl:

perl -pe 's/[^\\]+$/\n/' <infile.txt >outfile.txt

Taking this in pieces:

-p causes Perl to wrap the statement (supplied with -e) in a while loop, apply the statement to each line of the input file, and print the result.

-e gives Perl a statement to run against every line.

s/[^\\]+$/\n/ is a substitution statement that uses a regular expression to change any sequence of characters not including a backslash at the end of the line, to just a newline \n.

[^\\] is a regular expression that matches any single character that is not a backslash

[^\\]+ is a regular expression that matches one or more characters that are not a backslash

[^\\]+$ is a regular expression that matches one or more characters that are not a backslash followed by the end of the line

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Using regexes might work, but using a module designed for this purpose is generally speaking a better idea. File::Basename or File::Spec are suitable core modules for this purpose:

Code:

use strict;
use warnings;
use v5.10;

use File::Basename;

say dirname($_) for <DATA>;

__DATA__
d:\snow\dir.txt
d:\snow\history\dir.tff
d:\snow\history\help.jar
d:\winter\show\help.txt
d:\summer\beach\ocean\swimming.txt

Output:

d:\snow
d:\snow\history
d:\snow\history
d:\winter\show
d:\summer\beach\ocean

Of course, if you want ending backslashes, you'll have to add them.

And for File::Spec:

my ($volume, $dir, $file) = File::Spec->splitpath($path);
my $wanted_path = $volume . $dir;  # what you want

These two modules have been part of the core distribution for a long time, which is a nice benefit.

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You can do with this one liner also

perl -pe s /\\\\\w+\.\w+$// test.csv > Output.txt

\w+\.\w+$ matches for the filename with the extension which is at the end of the path

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Here's one way to do it in Python:

python -c 'import sys,re;[sys.stdout.write(re.sub("[^\\\]+$","\n",l))for l in sys.stdin]' < in.txt > out.txt

I'll admit it's a bit more verbose than a Perl solution.

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