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Documentation for EVERY aggregate:

every(expression) : true if all input values are true, otherwise false

http://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.1/static/functions-aggregate.html


EVERY is semantically equivalent to COUNT(conditionIsTrue) = COUNT(*)

select person_id, 

    every(visited_site = 'http://stackoverflow.com') as visited_same_site_forever,

    count(case when visited_site = 'http://stackoverflow.com' then '^_^' end) 
    = count(*) as visited_same_site_forever2

from z
group by person_id
order by person_id

Output:

 person_id | visited_same_site_forever | visited_same_site_forever2 
-----------+---------------------------+----------------------------
        88 | f                         | f
     55327 | t                         | t
    256196 | f                         | f

Data source:

create table z(person_id int, visited_site varchar(100), datetime_visited timestamp);

insert into z values
(55327,'http://stackoverflow.com','Jan 1, 2010'),
(55327,'http://stackoverflow.com','Feb 14, 2012'),
(55327,'http://stackoverflow.com','May 1, 2012'),
(256196,'http://stackoverflow.com','February 1, 2012'),
(256196,'http://stackoverflow.com','February 2, 2012'),
(256196,'http://slashdot.org','May 2, 2012'),
(88,'http://theregister.co.uk','April 1, 2012'),
(88,'http://slashdot.org','April 2, 2012');
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Emulating EVERY() with CASE and SUM()

In fact, this article describes how EVERY() can be emulated via CASE and SUM(). The following two statements are equivalent:

SELECT EVERY(id < 10)
FROM book

SELECT CASE SUM(CASE WHEN id < 10 THEN 0 ELSE 1 END) 
         WHEN 0 THEN 1 
         ELSE 0 
       END
FROM book;

The same is true for the EVERY() window function:

SELECT 
  book.*, 
  EVERY(title LIKE '%a') OVER (PARTITION BY author_id)
FROM book

SELECT
  book.*,
  CASE SUM(CASE WHEN title LIKE '%a' THEN 0 ELSE 1 END)
       OVER(PARTITION BY author_id)
    WHEN 0 THEN 1 
    ELSE 0
  END
FROM book;

SQL Standard

The SQL:2008 standard mentions the EVERY aggregate function:

10.9 <aggregate function>

[...]

<aggregate function> ::=
  COUNT <left paren> <asterisk> <right paren> [ <filter clause> ]
  | <general set function> [ <filter clause> ]
  | <binary set function> [ <filter clause> ]
  | <ordered set function> [ <filter clause> ]

<general set function> ::=
  <set function type> <left paren> [ <set quantifier> ]
  <value expression> <right paren>

<set function type> ::=
  <computational operation>

<computational operation> ::=
  AVG
  | MAX
  | MIN
  | SUM
  | EVERY
  | [...]

But "advanced" SQL standard features are not often implemented by databases. Oracle 11g for instance, doesn't support it, neither does SQL Server 2012.

With HSQLDB, however, you may be more lucky. HSQLDB 2.x is very standards-compliant, also MySQL knows the BIT_AND() aggregate function, which is a non-standard alias to EVERY(), also supported by Postgres.

Note, some databases allow for writing user-defined aggregate functions, so you may as well implement EVERY() yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the answer :-) MySQL could have renamed BIT_AND to BOOL_AND. Postgresql's EVERY is an alias for BOOL_AND, Postgresql has BIT_AND too. Tried MySQL BIT_AND now, it works. However, MySQL don't have proper boolean, but there's a duality between its integer and boolean, that's why its BIT_AND is functionally equivalent to BOOL_AND/EVERY anyhow. Thanks :-) –  Hao May 2 '12 at 9:05
    
@Hao: Yes, those databases copy some ideas off one another, so you see the same similar functions floating around here and there –  Lukas Eder May 2 '12 at 9:26
    
@Hao: Not sure if this is still important to you, but I've figured out a way to emulate EVERY() with SUM() and CASE... –  Lukas Eder Jan 7 at 18:37

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