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I need help understanding how to abstract out just the interaction from a UIViewController. For all intents and purposes, say I have a view controller that controls a puzzle. I have a array of piece views, a puzzle board view (the place where you put the pieces), and a few other miscellaneous views. Right now I have the typical pan-style interaction with those puzzle pieces.

What I need to do is abstract out that interaction so that I can, at the click of a button or call of a method, totally change the 'interaction mode', so to speak, of the entire system, while keeping the state of everything else exactly where it was before the switch. For example, instead of dragging the pieces with their finger, after the switch, they would have to 'select' a piece and then slide it using gravity with the gyro.

I am quite new to iOS and actually have very little OO experience in general, so I really want some advice from more experienced persons before I mutilate my code to figure this out. (Yes, I will take a snapshot, but I am still nervous!) Anyway, I was thinking maybe I should do something like this:

  • Have a root view controller that would keep the strong pointers to my views and take care of everything non-interaction related
  • Have a pointer in that root view controller to an interaction controller whose job it is to handle all interaction code
  • The interaction controller will get its views through delegation from the root view controller at run time through delegation and attach any gesture recognizers, etc. to the views in viewDidLoad
  • The interaction controller would be switched out at run time. Acceptable interaction controller objects would be from subclasses of some UIInteractionViewController that I defined for this purpose.

I have no idea if this would

a) actually work

b) be the best way to do it

c) be fast enough to really work at run time

d) be scalable (I might need many of these different 'modes').

Actually, the more I look at what I wrote, the more I am starting to doubt the sense of it. Help, pleeeeeze.

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Good question.

From my point of view OO is a crucial point for app development. A lot of app developers do not have much experiences with OO at all, which leads to a lot of misunderstandings, irritations, strange questions and answers here on SO. First there's a lack of understanding of the basic architecture of Cocoas frameworks and how to use them, because those follow in many aspects the ideas of inheritance and object composition and make use of OO patterns. This lack causes either a extensive fight against the frameworks and/or (when first OO lessons are learned) a complete over-engineering with regard to OO concepts.

To your question: It seems you have learned enough about basic OO principles to understand what's going on inside the frameworks. Now you should be aware of keeping things simple. Your puzzle game sounds like a typical app: You work alone or with few people on it, the entire code base will be small, it's not a library, it's life cycle will rather be short, once done you'll fix bugs and have small improvements, but not adaptions to complete new environments and so on. So I don't think you should make heavy use of OO patterns for the problem described in the question (even though I guess the described solution would work).

I'd do something like this:

  1. Let your puzzel's view controller do all the event handling by implementing all the things needed like:

    touchesBegan, touchesMoved, touchesEnded, accelerometer:didAccelerate:

  2. Give this controller a mode and switch it on button pressed:

    int controlMode; // in PuzzleController.h

  3. Switch on control mode in your event handling like this:

Examples

-(void)touchesBegan:(NSSet *)touches withEvent:(UIEvent *)event
{
  switch (controlMode)
  {
    case ControlModeDrag:
      touchedPiece = [self findPiece:event];
    case ControlModeGravity:
      //do nothing;
    case ControlModeSomethingElse:
      // whatever
    default: //...
  }
}

-(void)touchesMoved:(NSSet *)touches withEvent:(UIEvent *)event
{
  switch (controlMode)
  {
    case ControlModeDrag:
      [self moveTouchedPiece:event];
    case ControlModeGravity:
      //do nothing;
    case ControlModeSomethingElse:
      // whatever
    default: //...
  }
}

-(void)touchesEnded:(NSSet *)touches withEvent:(UIEvent *)event
{
  switch (controlMode)
  {
    case ControlModeDrag:
      touchedPiece = nil; 
    case ControlModeGravity:
      touchedPiece = [self findPiece:event]; 
    case ControlModeSomethingElse:
      // whatever
    default: //...
  }
}

- (void)accelerometer:(UIAccelerometer *)accelerometer didAccelerate:(UIAcceleration *)acceleration 
{
  switch (controlMode)
  {
    case ControlModeDrag:
      //do nothing 
    case ControlModeGravity:
      [self moveTouchedPiece:accelaration]; 
    case ControlModeSomethingElse:
      // whatever
    default: //...
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm. Ok, yes I see your point about keeping thing simple. I was actually really trying to avoid switch statements, lol, but it really would be much more straightforward. Your solution does keep things nice and clean too, with the controlMode property. I think I will actually do it the way you described. Thanks so much for your help! –  mwiederrecht May 2 '12 at 10:12

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