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I am trying to manage an arrray of InfoWindow objects from the Google Maps JavaScript API v3. My array is defined as global so I can manage all the Infowindow objects like this:

I edited the code to add some details as Sean told:

            google.maps.event.addListener(markers[id], 'click', function() {


                for ( var i = 0; i < infowindows.length; i++ ) {
                    var infoWin = infowindows[i];
                    if ( infoWin === undefined || infoWin === null ) {
                        continue;
                    }
                    infoWin.close();

                }

                map.panTo(markers[id].getPosition());
                infowindows[id].open(map,markers[id]);
            });

The .close() function is not doing anything. I know that I am accessing the objects in a proper way because I can call .open() and it works. Anyone have an idea about this issue? Thanks!

EDIT (14 / 8 / 2012): It seemed to be a problem with CSS, so I managed to fix it by forcing the display style when I showed the map with some JQuery:

$('#google-map').css("display", "block !important");    

Thanks a lot for your kind answers!

share|improve this question
    
Is typeof infowindows[index] == "object" evaluating as true? – andresf May 2 '12 at 19:51
    
Thanx, andresf.Yes. And I can call infowindows[index].open() with no problems – gotardo May 3 '12 at 16:05

I started to add a comment, but I have multiple suggestions, so I'm adding a full answer for clarity. Here is my initial feedback, with one question:

  1. The JavaScript for - in loop is intended to be used to enumerate an object's properties and should generally be avoided when your intent is to iterate the contents of an Array. So, change the loop control to:

    for ( var i = 0; i < infowindows.length; i++ ) {

  2. There is no way to know for sure, but index within the for loop's definition does not include the var keyword, so it may be creating a global variable. If you refactor to use a traditional for loop, as suggested in #1, this possible problem is removed.

  3. There doesn't seem to be a need for the guard condition: if (typeof infowindows[index] == "object") {, so try removing the test altogether. If you know the array contains InfoWindow instances, this is unnecessary.

  4. The semicolon after the for loop's final closing brace, }, is unnecessary; I don't think it's doing any harm, but it should be removed.

Question: Is this code generating any errors?

Follow up to your comment:

You don't have to use for - in if you believe there will be null members in the array. If you have array members that have not been assigned, they will be undefined; if you have members that are null, it is because the code has set them to null. But in eather case, you can deal with those situations and still use array iteration:

for ( var i = 0; i < infowindows.length; i++ ) {
    var infoWin = infowindows[i];
    if ( infoWin === undefined || infoWin === null ) {
        //skips the remainder of the loop code and starts a new iteration
        continue;
    }

    infoWin.close();
}

Using for - in when your intent is loop iteration is a bad practice that works sometimes, but will eventually get you into trouble. It enumerates an object's properties and will even pull in properties from the prototype chain, so you are never entirely sure what you will be getting. Also, for - in may not enumerate the properties of the array in order, which can sometimes cause problems, because some code assumes that arrays are being traversed in order.

If you are using similar logic to call open() that is working well, I have to assume that code is making changes to the array between the two loops and doing something that is causing the looping where you call close() to fail. If you add some additional code to your question, it will be helpful.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi @Sean Mickey, thank you very much for your kind answer. The code is not generating any errors. I have consider the refactor advices you gave me but have some problems: I need to use the for - in structure because the array indexes arte not correlative, so infowindows[1] and infowindows[3] may exist but infowindows[2] could be null. The logic of the algorithm seems to work whenever I call infowindows[index].open() (I can open every infowindow from the for - in loop). But they just dont close... – gotardo May 17 '12 at 10:24
    
@gotardo Glad to help - I've added content in my answer in response to your comment. – Sean Mickey May 17 '12 at 12:13
    
Hi Sean, thank yo very much for your useful help. I have refactor the code as you told but it doesn't work. The fact is that: - infoWin is allways an InfoWindow Object when .close() Is called. - Instead of calling .close() I can call infowindows[i].open(map,markers[i]) so all the infowindows get open. – gotardo May 18 '12 at 6:34

Again, this is too long for a comment...

If infoWin.close() isn't closing the InfoWindow, the most obvious cause is that infoWin is not an InfoWindow.

            for ( var i = 0; i < infowindows.length; i++ ) {
                var infoWin = infowindows[i];
                if ( infoWin === undefined || infoWin === null ) {
                    continue;
                }
                infoWin.close();
            }

This loop iterates through an array of objects which you have called infowindows, and you test that infoWin is not undefined or null but that doesn't check that it's actually an InfoWindow.

Because .close() doesn't cause an error, whatever it is has a close() method. Only an InfoWindow has a getContent() method, so you could test for that as a positive indication that the object is actually an InfoWindow.

If it is an InfoWindow, then I think we'll need a link to your map. In that case, the close() method should work, so something must have changed that.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Andrew, thank you very much for your answer. Actually, infoWin is an infoWindow object, so I can do infoWin.open(map,markers[i]) and the loop opens every infoWindow in the map. – gotardo May 18 '12 at 23:33
    
@gotardo Could we have a link to a demonstrator then? Something must have changed the close() method. – Andrew Leach May 19 '12 at 8:09

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