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I want to check equality of two files containing double numbers.

I should consider near numbers equal e.g. differences of at most 0.0001.

It's easy to write a tester for that with C but is there an easier way? e.g. bash commands?

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How do the files look? Do they have the same structure? –  dirkgently May 2 '12 at 8:08
    
Are the files just a big binary list of doubles? Or are you really talking about an ASCII file full of floating point numbers? –  Benj May 2 '12 at 8:10
    
@dirkgently: want the behaviour be like diff command; but numbers can differ at most 1e-4 –  a-z May 2 '12 at 8:10
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Bash does not provide operators for floating point manipulations. You can look up bc and it should be fairly easy to integrate it in a bash script. –  dirkgently May 2 '12 at 8:12
    
@Benj: An ASCII file full of floating point numbers. –  a-z May 2 '12 at 8:13

2 Answers 2

Here is one way you can do it:

paste file1 file2  | awk '{d=$1-$2;if((d<0?-1*d:d)>0.0001) print $0 " " d }'

First use paste to print out corresponding lines. Then pass them to awk to subtract. Calculate the absolute difference and check if it is more than your tolerance of 0.00001. If so, print out both values and the difference.

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This would be a good answer if the comparable values in the files were guaranteed to appear on the same lines in each file, apparently that's not the case. –  Benj May 2 '12 at 8:53
    
It does not check the equality of strings. –  a-z May 2 '12 at 8:56

Bash does not provide operators for floating point manipulations. You can look up bc and it should be fairly easy to integrate it in a bash script.

See this article on Linux Journal. That should provide you with a starting point. It is upto you to work through the file structure.

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