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I don't have much experience working with C++. Rather I have worked more in C# and so, I wanted to ask my question by relating to what I would have done in there. I have to generate a specific format of the string, which I have to pass to another function. In C#, I would have easily generated the string through the below simple code.

string a = "test";
string b = "text.txt";
string c = "text1.txt";

String.Format("{0} {1} > {2}", a, b, c);

By generating such an above string, I should be able to pass this in system(). However, system accepts on char*

I am on Win32 C++ (not C++/CLI), and cannot use boost since it would include too much inclusion of all the files for a project which itself is very small. Something like sprintf() looks useful to me, but sprintf does not accept string as the a, b and c parameters. Any suggestions how I can generate these formatted string to pass to system in my program?

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marked as duplicate by moooeeeep, Patrick B., Dharmesh Kheni, pid, Mark Rotteveel Apr 24 at 9:57

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
you know that boost won't add any dependencies to your binaries, right? (It will, of course add dependencies to the source) –  Shep May 2 '12 at 9:26

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use sprintf in combination with std::string.c_str().

c_str() returns a const char* and works with sprintf:

string a = "test";
string b = "text.txt";
string c = "text1.txt";
char* x = new char[a.length() + b.length() + c.length() + 32];

sprintf(x, "%s %s > %s", a.c_str(), b.c_str(), c.c_str() );

string str = x;
delete[] x;

or you can use a pre-allocated char array if you know the size:

string a = "test";
string b = "text.txt";
string c = "text1.txt";
char x[256];

sprintf(x, "%s %s > %s", a.c_str(), b.c_str(), c.c_str() );
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Shouldn't {0}, {1}, {2} be %s ? And should I delete this char* x after the operation or it doesn't matter? –  user1240679 May 2 '12 at 8:32
    
What are {0}, {1}, {2} in sprintf? What is delete[x]? –  Igor R. May 2 '12 at 8:32
    
@IgorR. oops typo :) –  Luchian Grigore May 2 '12 at 8:33
    
@user1240679 that was a typo, se corrected version. You should delete the char* if allocated with new, otherwise it's a memory leak. –  Luchian Grigore May 2 '12 at 8:34
2  
@LuchianGrigore: I would seriously advise a combination of std::vector and snprintf to avoid both leaks and buffer overflows. See snprintf. –  Matthieu M. May 2 '12 at 9:00

The C++ way would be to use a std::stringstream object as:

std::stringstream fmt;
fmt << a << " " << b << " > " << c;

The C way would be to use sprintf.

The C way is difficult to get right since:

  • It is type unsafe
  • Requires buffer management

Of course, you may want to fall back on the C way if performance is an issue (imagine you are creating fixed-size million little stringstream objects and then throwing them away).

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system(fmt) gives me an erros saying no suitable conversion between stringstream to char* –  user1240679 May 2 '12 at 8:26
    
if you want the std::string afterwards you need to call the str() method. If you need a char* afterwards ... –  moooeeeep May 2 '12 at 8:32
1  
system(fmt.str().c_str()) should probably do it. Note that on windows at least, if you call system() and you get errors even though the command and its arguments are correct and properly-quoted, surround the whole thing in quotes and it'll work. –  Shadow2531 May 2 '12 at 8:38
    
Two things to note: 1) system is implementation defined -- so do not use it if you want to keep your code portable. 2) As others have mentioned, use fmt.str().c_str() to get to the char * (C-style string) representation of the string. –  dirkgently May 2 '12 at 9:06

If Boost is not an option you are free to choose the stringstream way, or (in this case) std::string's very own string concatenation capabilities:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main() {
    std::string a = "a", b = "b", c = "c";
    std::string str = a + " " + b + " > " + c;
    std::cout << str << "\n";
}

If you really want to adopt the C way. Here you go:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <cstdio>

int main() {
    std::string a = "a", b = "b", c = "c";
    const char fmt[] = "%s %s > %s";
    // use std::vector for your memory management (to avoid memory leaks)
    std::vector<char> buf;
    buf.resize(a.length()+b.length()+c.length()+sizeof(fmt));
    // use snprintf instead of sprintf (to avoid buffer overflows)
    std::snprintf(&buf[0], buf.size(), fmt, a.c_str(), b.c_str(), c.c_str());
    // assign to std::string
    std::string str = &buf[0];
    std::cout << str << "\n";
}

However, I find this comparatively ugly.


Then, there's the Boost Format Library. For the sake of your example:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <boost/format.hpp>

int main() {
    std::string a = "a", b = "b", c = "c";
    // apply format
    boost::format fmt = boost::format("%s %s > %s") % a % b % c; 
    // assign to std::string
    std::string str = fmt.str();
    std::cout << str << "\n";
}
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The OP had mentioned that boost can't be used :/ –  dirkgently May 2 '12 at 9:05
    
@dirkgently see my edit –  moooeeeep May 2 '12 at 9:05

As already mentioned the C++ way is using stringstreams.

#include <sstream>

string a = "test";
string b = "text.txt";
string c = "text1.txt";

std::stringstream ostr;
ostr << a << " " << b << " > " << c;

Note that you can get the C string from the string stream object like so.

std::string formatted_string = ostr.str();
const char* c_str = formatted_string.c_str();
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You can just concatenate the strings and build a command line.

std::string command = a + ' ' + b + " > " + c;
system(command.c_str());

You don't need any extra libraries for this.

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For completeness, the boost way would be to use boost::format

cout << boost::format("%s %s > %s") % a % b % c;

Take your pick. The boost solution has the advantage of type safety with the sprintf format (for those who find the << syntax a bit clunky).

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In addition to options suggested by others I can recommend the C++ Format library which implements string formatting similar to str.format in Python and String.Format in C#. Here's an example:

std::string a = "test";
std::string b = "text.txt";
std::string c = "text1.txt";
std::string result = fmt::format("{0} {1} > {2}", a, b, c);

Disclaimer: I'm the author of this library.

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Here's what I use:

static LPCWSTR formatString(LPCWSTR format, ...)
{
    WCHAR buffer[4096];
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, format);
    vswprintf_s(buffer, format, args);
    size_t bytes = (wcslen(buffer) + 1) * sizeof(WCHAR);
    LPWSTR result = (LPWSTR) malloc(bytes);
    memcpy(result, buffer, bytes);
    va_end(args);
    return result;
}
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