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I have the following code:

void f(String t)
{
  if(t.equals("a"))
  {
    someObject.setType(ObjectType.TYPE_A);
  }
 else if(t.equals("b"))
  {
    someObject.setType(ObjectType.TYPE_B);
  }

// 50 more similar code

}

Is there any simple way to rewrite the if-else condition so as not to have that much code?

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6 Answers

up vote 46 down vote accepted

You should use something to eliminate the repetition of someObject.setType(ObjectType....)) If ObjectType is an enum, then write a method there similar to valueOf that will achieve that. See if you like this kind of solution:

void f(String t) { someObject.setType(ObjectType.byName(t)); }

enum ObjectType {
  TYPE_A, TYPE_B;
  public static ObjectType byName(String name) {
    return valueOf("TYPE_" + name.toUpperCase());
  }
}
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2  
Brilliant.. I didn't know about valueOf method.. thanks.. –  Asha May 2 '12 at 9:30
2  
Not nit-picking, you just need to be careful with the exception handling here; You have to wrap the return value in a try-catch block, to handle garbage-in scenarios. –  questzen May 2 '12 at 14:18
    
@questzen Well sure, this is just the basic outline. Depending on wish there are various approaches to handling garbage. I personally most often prefer the raw exception (if it is indeed an error to pass in garbage). That gives you the most direct debug info. –  Marko Topolnik May 2 '12 at 16:14
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Use a Map (which you'll have to populate) that maps from String to whatever type your ObjectType.TYPE_x values are.

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Yes, that's what I was thinking too. But only doubt I had was memory required to store those strings and the lookup required to get the type. Is there no other way? –  Asha May 2 '12 at 9:13
2  
@Asha the strings in the map (because they're interned) will take no more space than the string literals. The lookup time will be reduced because the map lookup will be O(log n) instead of O(n). –  Alnitak May 2 '12 at 9:14
    
@Alnitak Using a HashMap could even get to O(1). –  Matthias Meid May 2 '12 at 9:19
    
@Asha If you use an enum, you won't have to manage the map explicitly. See my updated answer. –  Marko Topolnik May 2 '12 at 9:21
    
@Mudu yup, that would be a good (concrete) implementation to use in this instance. –  Alnitak May 2 '12 at 9:27
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I would add this as a functionality of the enum:

public enum ObjectType {
    TYPE_A("a"),
    TYPE_B("b");

    private String stringType;

    private ObjectType(String stringType) {
        this.stringType = stringType;
    }

    public String getStringType() {
        return this.stringType;
    }

    public static ObjectType fromStringType(String s) {
        for (ObjectType type : ObjectType.values()) {
            if (type.stringType.equals(s)) {
                return type;
            }
        }
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("No ObjectType with stringType " + s);
    }
}

...

void f(String t) {
    someObject.setType(ObjectType.fromStringType(t));
}
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This is the method I usually use. Is better than relying on the constant names because it is more flexible and harder to break. –  Malcolm May 2 '12 at 14:31
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If you can refactor t into a char, you could use switch instead (Java 6):

void f(char t) {

  switch(t) {

    case 'a`:
      someObject.setType(ObjectType.TYPE_A);
      break;
    case 'b':
      someObject.setType(ObjectType.TYPE_B);
      break;

    // ...

  }

}

As Marko pointed out, you could go with String too in Java 7.

It isn't that much shorter, but more elegant. Moreover, I think it might be faster too, as switch works close to O(1) with jump tables (Can somebody confirm whether this is true?), whether a number of if statements is O(n).

Fore more complex implementations than just a single setType you might think of a State Pattern implementation too.

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1.You can go for Switch statement if you have number of if conditions more than 3.

2.you can convert your if else statements to ternary operations

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The other suggestions are great - particularly smarter enums and maps. But the first most basic refactoring I would tackle here is to extract a method to return the enum directly and have the caller perform nothing more than the setType to that method's return value.

void f(String t) {
  final ObjectType type = findType(t);
  if (type != null)
    someObject.setType(type);
  }

ObjectType findType(String t) {
  if (t.equals("a")) return ObjectType.TYPE_A;
  if (t.equals("b")) return ObjectType.TYPE_B;
  // 50 more similar code
  }

In some cases this will be sufficient in and of itself; in others the findType() method may lead you to a simple map- or enum-based solution.

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