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Since the vast majority of monitors are 16-bit color or more, including mobile devices, does it make sense to even consider web-safe colors when choosing color schemes? Or is it something that ought to be relegated to history as a piece of trivia?

For those of you that don't know what web-safe colors are:

Another set of 216 color values is commonly considered to be the "web-safe" color palette, developed at a time when many computer displays were only capable of displaying 256 colors. A set of colors was needed that could be shown without dithering on 256-color displays; the number 216 was chosen partly because computer operating systems customarily reserved sixteen to twenty colors for their own use; it was also selected because it allows exactly six shades each of red, green, and blue (6 × 6 × 6 = 216).

The list of colors is often presented as if it has special properties that render them immune to dithering. In fact, on 256-color displays applications can set a palette of any selection of colors that they choose, dithering the rest. These colors were chosen specifically because they matched the palettes selected by the then leading browser applications. [Wikipedia]

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8  
Interesting it seems to be so far in the past that a lot of the readers didn't quite get the point of the question. –  Kevin Peterson Jun 24 '09 at 22:03
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When we did Windows 3.1 games, we had to set the palette up to allow all those system colors. It was a similar problem. I wonder how many SO participants are too young to remember windows 3.1 :-) –  Nosredna Jun 25 '09 at 15:10
    
What about non-for-profits that need to be Bobby compliant? –  user704739 Apr 12 '11 at 19:20
    
I'm thinking it's pretty irrelevant for them. As far as I can find there is no such thing as Bobby compliance. Bobby was a tool (suite of tests) developed for assessing whether a website was accessible or not. It's passed through a couple of hands and is now dead in the hands of IBM: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobby_%28software%29 –  Gavin Miller Apr 12 '11 at 19:32

12 Answers 12

up vote 53 down vote accepted

For me web safe color palette is no longer primary concern. Optimize for the largest target audience.

According to w3schools only 1% of their site visitors in January 2009 had 256 color displays, 95% of users had 24 or 32 bit.

I found similar numbers from a business app site that I look after:

32-bit  79.01%  

24-bit  15.64%  

16-bit  5.27%   

8-bit   0.08%
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12  
Best answer because it references real data –  adolf garlic Jun 25 '09 at 7:21
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It also depends on your target audience. For most people, this is probably not an issue. For a site catering to a tech-savvy crowd, probably even less so. I guess it's possible that there is a website out there that caters to a demographic that is statistically less likely to have modern equipment. –  Beska Sep 1 '09 at 17:18

I don't think web safe colors are relevant any more. To me, a much bigger problem for smartphones are all the fixed-width 960-pixel wide web pages.

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I think the most important thing when choosing a colour palette is keeping in mind colour-blindness. There are a few different types that I know of, but the main thing is making sure that you have enough contrast between colours.

For example green text on a red background might be easier for some to read, but very difficult or maybe impossible for others (5-10% of males!), especially if the values of the colours are close.

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+1- Excellent Point –  Gavin Miller Aug 18 '09 at 20:33

For those of us (like me) that didn't know exactly what web safe colors are, they were

developed at a time when many computer displays were only capable of displaying 256 colors. A set of colors was needed that could be shown without dithering on 256-color displays; the number 216 was chosen partly because computer operating systems customarily reserved sixteen to twenty colors for their own use; it was also selected because it allows exactly six shades each of red, green, and blue (6 × 6 × 6 = 216).

The list of colors is often presented as if it has special properties that render them immune to dithering. In fact, on 256-color displays applications can set a palette of any selection of colors that they choose, dithering the rest. These colors were chosen specifically because they matched the palettes selected by the then leading browser applications.

It's hard to imagine any of this applying to today's modern displays, since almost nobody runs their display in 256 colors anymore (unless perhaps they are playing an old version of Leisure Suit Larry).

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@Robert - I hadn't realized people wouldn't know what that was. I grabbed your reference and grafted it into the question. –  Gavin Miller Jun 24 '09 at 21:44
    
I knew what they were, I had just never gotten around to finding out exactly why they exist, and I hadn't considered them important in my current web development, an admittedly naive position. –  Robert Harvey Jun 24 '09 at 21:47

In my opinion, its history.

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+1 for being right. –  Mike Cooper Jun 24 '09 at 21:34

It depends what you mean by web safe colours.

In terms of 16bit colour it's probably not worth worrying about. However Colours do not appear the same across devices. This can lead to all sorts of problems particularly if a designers gamma settings are different to your particular monitor set up.

So you still need to test your design across multiple set ups.

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According to research, even the web safe colors were not web safe. It was an interesting idea while it was relevant, thankfully that's over now.

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Web safe colors are pretty much not a problem anymore unless you are dealing with consumers that will have legacy (think > 10 year old) video display equipment.

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It takes an amazingly old monitor to cause problems. Video cards are a more common limitation of colour depth. –  Quentin Jun 24 '09 at 21:37
    
I've seen people go to 16-bit depth for the sake of a higher frame rate, but I don't see people go to 256-colors anymore. –  Nosredna Jun 24 '09 at 21:38
    
David - Thanks for the update - Fixed –  Brian Jun 24 '09 at 21:39

IMHO the point is really moot. Colors that aren't web safe are dithered anyway. It may not look the best in 256-color modes but as long as functional elements of the page/applications are not dependent on those colors it will not disturb the user experience that much.

Also most users surfing in 256-color modes will be aware of the fact colors will be dithered as I don't think that a lot of sites adhere to the web-safe colorschemes anymore.

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Yes, it's definitely a thing of the past. Place its importance right next to your marquee tags.

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Some colors do not display on some mobile devices. (trying to make a list)

The title bars are supposed to be a blue fade from CSS:

background: linear-gradient(to bottom, #0099CC1, #0033CC) repeat-x scroll 0 0 #006DCC;

On many devices the background is not visible, and the header looks like white-on-white.

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You cannot guarantee that your website/app/whatever you are making is going to show as the same exactly color everywhere. Stick to colors with different ranges and do not use many colors - 3 at maximum. You can use this Adobe Kuler here to pick up a good array of colors, if you need to do so.

Web-safe colors are not relevant anymore, and even when they were supposed to be, they did not solve at all the main problem definitely, as many have said before. Also, it seems that not all humans see colors the same way.

If i can make a addendum: remember to think about color-blind folks. It's like almost 10% of web users. I found it here.

So, i would suggest that if anyone is searching for a kind of safe solution for colors like I was, to just stick with few colors as possible, and from different ranges, so you won't have a problem with color-blinded, or big difference in palettes across devices.

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Downvoter? Explain so i can improve my answer. :) –  Malavos Dec 12 '13 at 12:22

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