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Is there was correct syntax to use jQuery's $().ready to check whether the DOM is ready, rather than create a callback function once the DOM has loaded?

For example, I want to run different code if the DOM is ready.

function checkDOMReady() 
{
    if ($(document).ready)
        alert("The DOM was ready when this function was called");
    else
        alert("The DOM was NOT ready when this function was called");
}

Is this valid? If not is there a correct way of doing this?

EDIT: I am well aware of $(document).ready(function(){}); and the like, but this is not what I am looking for. I have a script that runs every 10 minutes, including when the page is initially loaded, and I want to run different code if the document is ready, and other code if it is not. I could store this data in a global/static variable, but I would like to know whether it is possible simple evaluate a Boolean expression to check if the DOM can be manipulated.

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1  
$(document).ready(function(){ //do whatever call whatever }); this will sort you out with document.ready and if I may surest go here api.jquery.com pretty saweet site, have a good one man! –  Tats_innit May 2 '12 at 11:20
    
Der explicitly says he doesn't want to use a callback function... –  Lucero May 2 '12 at 11:22
    
Oh I am well aware of this, but I am running the same script both before the document has loaded, and every 10 minutes, and I need to be able to distinguish between the two. –  Der Flatulator May 2 '12 at 11:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't see why you'd want to do this. In any case, you can have a variable that is set in the document ready callback and check the variable.

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I could use a global variable or pass it as a parameter, but I would like to know if this is possible, as I am am running the script both before the document has loaded, and every 10 minutes, and I need to be able to distinguish between the two. –  Der Flatulator May 2 '12 at 11:24
    
I've marked this as correct as it is a solution, even though it isn't exactly what I was asking. –  Der Flatulator May 2 '12 at 11:53

with jQuery you can use:

    var isready = false;

    $(function() {
     isready = true;
    });

Read more about it at here

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Again, I don't want to wait for the code to be executed on ready, I want to be able to CHECK whether it is ready to make an action accordingly. –  Der Flatulator May 2 '12 at 11:29
    
Made a change, using the variable then you can easily check in your document if isready is true then execute what you need. –  Sandeep Bansal May 2 '12 at 12:24
    
Yep, that's what I have done. –  Der Flatulator May 2 '12 at 14:20

@Lucero is right, but there are some cases when you need a flag to indicate that the content is ready (maybe to synchronize with another framework ...). If this is the case, you can create a window scoped variable to signal and set its value on $(document).ready:

// declare your "global" flag as false
window.flagDomLoaded = false;

// set the global to true to signal that the contents are ready
$(document).ready(function(){ window.flagDomLoaded = true; });

// check the global flag on your code
function checkDOMReady() 
{
    if (window.flagDomLoaded)
        alert("The DOM was ready when this function was called");
    else
        alert("The DOM was <b>NOT</b> ready when this function was called");
}

Please note that I'd recommend you to use a more standard approach, like @Lucero or @Sandeep solutions. This solution is just acceptable if you cannot do it that way.

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Well this is pretty much how I have my code right now, if you removed the instances of "window.", which works. I was just curious whether jQuery supported such a method (which it appears it doesn't). –  Der Flatulator May 2 '12 at 11:44

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