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I am having problems with an array which i want to re-use in my program. I need to change the size dynamically and clear it. But unfortunately the resizing does not work.

uint8_t * readBuffer; // Create array pointer

readBuffer = (uint8_t *) malloc(4); // Mem. alloc. 4bytes
memset(readBuffer, 0, sizeof(readBuffer); // Reset array
// Do stuff
free(readBuffer) // Release mem. block
....
readBuffer = (uint8_t *) malloc(1) // Mem. alloc. 1byte
memset(readBuffer, 0, sizeof(readBuffer); // Reset array
// Do stuff
free(readBuffer) // Release mem. block

At the the resizing step the length of my array is still the former (4).

Am i using free all wrong?

Further more is there much more efficient alternatives to memset for clearing?

Thanks in advance.

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How do you know it's 4? Also, why not realloc? –  Pubby May 2 '12 at 11:51
    
I check with sizeof(readBuffer) –  JavaCake May 2 '12 at 11:51
    
sizeof(readBuffer) doesn't return the size of the memory allocated by malloc , it just returns the number of bytes required to store the pointer value. –  Naveen May 2 '12 at 11:52
    
@Naveen, is there an alternative to finding the length? –  JavaCake May 2 '12 at 11:53
5  
this has been said over and over but I'll still repeat it (as this is tagged C++): use std::vector and your problems are solved. And if you really must acces the raw memory, use &(*vector.begin()) –  stijn May 2 '12 at 11:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Size of a pointer (e.g. readBuffer) is always same (here 4 bytes) for any data type. You need to rather store the size given inside the malloc into a temporary and then use memset():

uint size = 4;
readBuffer = (uint8_t *) malloc(size); // Mem. alloc. 4bytes
memset(readBuffer, 0, size); // Reset array

Moreover argument to malloc() is in bytes, so malloc(1) means ideally 1 byte. If you are using C++ then use new:

readBuffer = new uint8_t[N];  // 'N' is number of elements of "uint8_t"

Edit:

In C++, std::vector provides this facility with much ease:

std::vector<uint8_n> readBuffer(N, 0);

Here you are allocating 'N' elements for readBuffer and initializing them to 0.
Whenever you want to add elements, you can use push_back() method. For bigger chunks you may also explore resize() or reserve() methods.

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4  
"If you are using C++ then use new", I would say use std::vector<uint8_n>. –  Naveen May 2 '12 at 12:04
    
@Naveen, agree and added. –  iammilind May 2 '12 at 12:14
    
The first approach works, i will use it for now, next version might be with std::vector. –  JavaCake May 2 '12 at 12:19

At the the resizing step the length of my array is still the former (4).

The problem is that sizeof(readBuffer) returns the size of the pointer, and not the amount of memory allocated by malloc(). If you want to track the latter, you have to do it yourself.

Am i using free all wrong?

No, you're using free() correctly.

is there much more efficient alternatives to memset for clearing?

I doubt there's a much more efficient way. You could trying using calloc(), which is just like malloc() but zero-initializes the memory for you.

Lastly, it is a good idea to check whether malloc() has returned NULL, which it could do if there's not enough memory to satisfy the request.

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uint8_t * readBuffer; // Create array pointer

readBuffer = (uint8_t *) malloc(4); // Mem. alloc. 4bytes
memset(readBuffer, 0, sizeof(readBuffer); // Reset array
// Do stuff
free(readBuffer) // Release mem. block
....
readBuffer = (uint8_t *) malloc(1) // Mem. alloc. 1byte
memset(readBuffer, 0, sizeof(readBuffer); // Reset array
// Do stuff
free(readBuffer) // Release mem. block

The casting of the malloc isn't necessary. Also, readBuffer doesn't have a size, what you want to do is sizeof(Uint8_t) * 4. This gives your the right size.

And instead of malloc, you should use realloc, since you want to re-allocate an excisting pointer of memory blocks. The return value of this points to the new memory block, or NULL, if no memory on the heap is available. New code:

uint8_t * readBuffer; // Create array pointer

readBuffer = malloc(4); // Mem. alloc. 4bytes
memset(readBuffer, 0, (sizeof(uint8_t) * 4)); // Reset array
// Do stuff
free(readBuffer) // Release mem. block
....
uint8_t * temp = realloc(readBuffer, 1); // Mem. alloc. 1byte
if(temp != NULL) readBuffer = temp; //Check if their was enough room to allocate memory
memset(readBuffer, 0, (sizeof(uint8_t) * 4)); // Reset array
// Do stuff
free(readBuffer) // Release mem. block
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