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I started learning Delphi two days ago but I got stuck. I broke down because nothing goes my way so I decided to write here. I wanted to create class that would have a field with its own TTimer object and which will perform some action at some time interval. Is it even possible? Suppose we have such code:

Sth = class
private

public
  clock:TTimer;
  procedure clockTimer(Sender: TObject);
  constructor Create();
end;

constructor Sth.Create()
begin
  clock.interval:=1000;
  clock.OnTimer := clockTimer;
end;

procedure Sth.clockTimer(Sender: TObject);
begin
  //some action on this Sth object at clock.interval time...
end;

My similar code copiles but it doesn't work properly. When I call the constructor the program crashes down (access violation at line: clock.interval:=1000;). I don't know what

Sender:TObject 

does but I think that's not the problem. Is it possible to create such class I want to?

share|improve this question
    
TTimers are very frequently fields of Delphi classes. Form classes are classes, and every time you put a TTimer on a form, the IDE declares a TTimer field for you. –  Rob Kennedy May 2 '12 at 12:59
    
I know that IDE declares TTimer field for me when I put it on a form. But I wanted to put TTimer as a field of class that has no form. I wanted to write separate class (*.pas file) without a form and linked it to the main form. So, without form, I had to write all declarations on my own. I don't know if it is good approach(not using form with secondary classes), I don't even know matter of forms yet. But now everthing works fine after David Heffernan answer. –  xan May 2 '12 at 13:12
    
This basic issue (you didn't know that you have to create objects before you use it) indicates to me you might benefit from reading some basic material, like the first few chapters of one of the big old Delphi books like the Marco cantu one (mastering delphi 7 or something like that), or at least, spending some more time at delphibasics.co.uk –  Warren P May 3 '12 at 1:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You have not created the timer. Declaring a variable is not enough. You do need to create the timer.

constructor Sth.Create()
begin
  clock := TTimer.Create(nil);
  clock.interval:=1000;
  clock.OnTimer := clockTimer;
end;

And you should destroy it too. Add a destructor to the class

destructor Destroy; override;

and implement it like this

destructor Sth.Destroy;
begin
  clock.Free;
  inherited;
end;

I would also recommend that you make your clock field have private visibility. It's not good to expose the internals of a class like that.

TMyClass = class
private
  FClock: TTimer;
  procedure ClockTimer(Sender: TObject);
public
  constructor Create;
  destructor Destroy; override;
end;
....
constructor TMyClass.Create
begin
  inherited;
  FTimer := TTimer.Create(nil);
  FTimer.Interval := 1000;
  FTimer.OnTimer := ClockTimer;
end;

destructor TMyClass.Destroy;
begin
  FTimer.Free;
  inherited;
end;

Note that I have included calls to the inherited constructor and destructor. These are not necessary in this class since it derives directly from TObject and the constructor and destructor for TObject is empty. But if you change the inheritance at some point, and make your class derive from a different class, then you will need to do this. So, in my view, it is good practise to include these calls always.

share|improve this answer
    
the line: clock := TTimer.Create; does not compile. It says: "Not enough actual parameters". –  xan May 2 '12 at 12:40
    
Now everything is OK. But the last question: Why TTimer.Create(nil)? How important is nil here? Why we have to write it? Thank you very, very much! :-) –  xan May 2 '12 at 12:46
3  
The constructor receives a parameter named Owner of type TComponent. If your class derived from TComponent then it could pass Self and then your instance would own the timer. That means that the timer would be automatically destroyed when its owner was destroyed. This is used extensively in the VCL. It's not needed here so you pass nil to opt-out of the ownership mechanism. –  David Heffernan May 2 '12 at 12:51
1  
Just some more information about TTimer. The TTimer class is making a call to AllocateHwnd to manage communication with windows messaging system. This call is not thread safe, so be careful if your class is to be used in a thread. For more input see: allocatehwnd-is-not-thread-safe. –  LU RD May 2 '12 at 13:07
    
Since the TTimer is created and destroyed with the form, why not make the form the owner of the TTimer? FTimer := TTimer.Create(Self) –  Jerry Gagnon May 2 '12 at 14:30

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