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In the following code we are returning a const object and collecting it in a non const object, and still it compiles without an error or a warning..

class foo
{
    int i;
public:
    const foo& call() const
    {
        return *this;
    }
};

int main()
{
    foo aa, bb;
    bb = aa.call();
}
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2  
BTW, question titles such as "Why does this work?" are discouraged in favour of more descriptive titles. –  Nick May 2 '12 at 13:34
1  
Much better title :) –  Nick May 2 '12 at 13:48
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2 Answers 2

You're actually taking a copy of a const object when you do bb = aa.call( ) which will call the implicit copy constructor on foo.

If you wanted to break the compilation then try:

foo aa;
foo& bb = aa.call( );

Note:

The implicit copy constructor is generally defined as:

foo( const foo& exist );

and in the default case just does a member-wise copy.

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1  
You might want to explain why a copy is being made –  Tom Knapen May 2 '12 at 13:30
    
@TomKnapen: Done. (I hope!) –  Nick May 2 '12 at 13:32
1  
Nicely done! Consider my previous comment obsolete. –  Tom Knapen May 2 '12 at 13:35
1  
"shallow copy" isn't necessarily correct. It does a member-wise copy, so you'll get a shallow copy if and only if it contains at least one raw pointer. –  Jerry Coffin May 2 '12 at 13:41
    
Jerry: Thanks. Updated. –  Nick May 2 '12 at 13:44
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This code calls the implicitly defined copy assign operator foo& foo::operator=(const foo&):

    int main()
    {
        foo aa, bb;
        bb = aa.call();//  equivalent to bb.operator=(aa.call());
    }

The argument to that assign operator is a const reference to foo, so can bind directly the reference returned by foo::call. There is no copy constructor called in any of this code.

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