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กิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิ ก้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้ ก็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ ก็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ กิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิ ก้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้ ก็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ กิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิ ก้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้ กิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิ ก้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้ ก็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ ก็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ กิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิ ก้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้ ก็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ กิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิ ก้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้

These recently showed up in facebook comment sections.

How can we sanitize this?

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4  
Haven't you asked this question before? (Honest question.) –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE May 2 '12 at 13:35
4  
Those are most definitely not ascii –  Chris May 2 '12 at 13:35
18  
Why the closing votes? It's a programming-related question, as I want to know how to sanitize this type of input so the comment sections on my website will not be the 13 years old's playground... –  Cristy May 2 '12 at 13:51
5  
กิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิ ก้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้ ก็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ ก็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ กิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิ ก้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้ ก็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ กิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิ ก้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้ กิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิ ก้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้ ก็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ ก็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ กิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิ ก้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้ ก็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ กิิิิิิิิิิิิิิิ"so the comment sections on my website will not be the 13 years old's playground." Actually without sanitization one posting these characters can make the comment above it unreadable, which is not at all a pleasent user experience. –  Cristy May 2 '12 at 22:21
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@pjotr It's definetly not a browser bug. If you want the characters not to overflow the containing box you can simply solve that with CSS (overflow:hidden;)... –  Cristy May 3 '12 at 11:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 64 down vote accepted

What's up with these unicode characters?

That's a character with a series of combining characters. Because the combining characters in question want to go above the base character, they stack up (literally). For instance, the case of

ก้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้้

...it's an ก (Thai character ko kai) (U+0E01) followed by 20 copies of the Thai combining character mai tho (U+0E49).

How can we sanitize this?

You could pre-process the text and limit the number of combining characters that can be applied to a single character, but the effort may not be worth the reward. You'd need the data sheets for all the current characters so you'd know whether they were combining or what, and you'd need to be sure to allow at least a few because some languages are written with several diacritics on a single base. Now, if you want to limit comments to the Latin character set, that would be an easier range check, but of course that's only an option if you want to limit comments to just a few languages. More information, code sheets, etc. at unicode.org.

BTW, if you ever want to know how some character was composed, for another question just recently I coded up a quick-and-dirty "Unicode Show Me" page on JSBin. You just copy and paste the text into the text area, and it shows you all of the code points (~characters) that the text is made up of, with links such as those above to the page describing each character. It only works for code points in the range U+FFFF and under, because it's written in JavaScript and to handle characters above U+FFFF in JavaScript you have to do more work than I wanted to do for that question (because in JavaScript, a "character" is always 16 bits, which means for some languages a character can be split across two separate JavaScript "characters" and I didn't account for that), but it's handy for most texts...

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1  
Wouldn't you just delete repeated copies of the same combining codepoint back to back into a single copy? When would you ever need to combine the same codepoint onto a base codepoint more than once? –  Remy Lebeau May 2 '12 at 20:43
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@RemyLebeau: "When would you ever need to combine the same codepoint onto a base codepoint more than once?" I don't know, I know very, very little about how you write other languages -- Thai, for instance. I wouldn't be at all surprised to find out that more than one of the same code point was valid in some. But doing that doesn't reduce the complexity; you still need one of the Unicode tables for figuring out which ones are combining characters. –  T.J. Crowder May 3 '12 at 8:07
    
I made your page accept the unicode string from the url e.g. jsbin.com/erajer/7/… –  ubershmekel Mar 12 '13 at 16:04
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JavaScript library to easily remove Unicode combining marks from strings: mths.be/stripcombiningmarks –  Mathias Bynens Jan 8 at 8:55

If you have a regex engine with decent Unicode support, it's trivial to sanitize this kind of strings. In Perl, for example, you can remove all but the first combining mark from every (user-perceived) character like this:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use utf8;

binmode(STDOUT, ':utf8');

my $string = "กิิ ก้้ ก็็ ก็็ กิิ ก้้ ก็็ กิิ ก้้ กิิ ก้้ ก็็ ก็็ กิิ ก้้ ก็็ กิิ ก้้";
$string =~ s/(\p{Mark})\p{Mark}+/$1/g; # Strip excess combining marks
print("$string\n");

This will print:

กิ ก้ ก็ ก็ กิ ก้ ก็ กิ ก้ กิ ก้ ก็ ก็ กิ ก้ ก็ กิ ก้

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4  
I can't read Tibetan, but I'm concerned that this brute force approach may remove functionality from the way the language is designed. I've seen unicode that has legitimate use-cases of more than one combining mark. Arabic is a good example. I'll try to remember to run this by my Tibetan co-workers. –  FlipMcF Mar 12 '13 at 19:18
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You're right, there are certainly cases where multiple combining marks are legitimate. But you can easily change the regex to allow a certain maximum of marks. –  nwellnhof Mar 12 '13 at 19:45
    
Upvoted because it does answer the 'how do you sanitize this' question. But I think this would be a maintenance nightmare. –  FlipMcF Mar 15 '13 at 0:08

"How can we sanitize this" is best answered above by T.J Crowder

However, I think sanitization is the wrong approach, and Cristy has it right with overflow:hidden on the css containing element.

At least, that's how I'm solving it.

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protected by Community Nov 11 '12 at 3:08

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