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In the example code below, I'd like to recover the return value of the function worker. How can I go about doing this? Where is this value stored?

Example Code:

import multiprocessing

def worker(procnum):
    '''worker function'''
    print str(procnum) + ' represent!'
    return procnum


if __name__ == '__main__':
    jobs = []
    for i in range(5):
        p = multiprocessing.Process(target=worker, args=(i,))
        jobs.append(p)
        p.start()

    for proc in jobs:
        proc.join()
    print jobs

Output:

0 represent!
1 represent!
2 represent!
3 represent!
4 represent!
[<Process(Process-1, stopped)>, <Process(Process-2, stopped)>, <Process(Process-3, stopped)>, <Process(Process-4, stopped)>, <Process(Process-5, stopped)>]

I can't seem to find the relevant attribute in the objects stored in jobs.

Thanks in advance, blz

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up vote 30 down vote accepted

Use shared variable to communicate. For example like this:

def worker(procnum, return_dict):
    '''worker function'''
    print str(procnum) + ' represent!'
    return_dict[procnum] = procnum


if __name__ == '__main__':
    manager = Manager()
    return_dict = manager.dict()
    jobs = []
    for i in range(5):
        p = multiprocessing.Process(target=worker, args=(i,return_dict))
        jobs.append(p)
        p.start()

    for proc in jobs:
        proc.join()
    print return_dict.values()
share|improve this answer
4  
I would recommend using a multiprocessing.Queue, rather than a Manager here. Using a Manager requires spawning an entirely new process, which is overkill when a Queue would do. – dano Apr 19 '15 at 0:54

I think the approach suggested by @sega_sai is the better one. But it really needs a code example, so here goes:

import multiprocessing
from os import getpid

def worker(procnum):
    print 'I am number %d in process %d' % (procnum, getpid())
    return getpid()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    pool = multiprocessing.Pool(processes = 3)
    print pool.map(worker, range(5))

Which will print the return values:

I am number 0 in process 19139
I am number 1 in process 19138
I am number 2 in process 19140
I am number 3 in process 19139
I am number 4 in process 19140
[19139, 19138, 19140, 19139, 19140]

If you are familiar with map (the Python built-in) this should not be too challenging. Otherwise have a look at sega_Sai's link.

Note how little code is needed. (Also note how processes are re-used).

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It seems that you should use the multiprocessing.Pool class instead and use the methods .apply() .apply_async(), map()

http://docs.python.org/library/multiprocessing.html?highlight=pool#multiprocessing.pool.AsyncResult

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You can use the exit built-in to set the exit code of a process. It can be obtained from the exitcode attribute of the process:

import multiprocessing

def worker(procnum):
    print str(procnum) + ' represent!'
    exit(procnum)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    jobs = []
    for i in range(5):
        p = multiprocessing.Process(target=worker, args=(i,))
        jobs.append(p)
        p.start()

    result = []
    for proc in jobs:
        proc.join()
        result.append(proc.exitcode)
    print result

Output:

0 represent!
1 represent!
2 represent!
3 represent!
4 represent!
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4]
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