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Is it possible to create a Google Drive Web Application using the Google Drive API without publishing the application to the Chrome Web Store?

I have tried to implement it. The authentication is now done, but now it complains about: "403 : The Authenticated user has not installed the app with the client id {clientid} "

Thanks in advance!

Regards,

Pedro

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1 Answer 1

Edit: This is now entirely possible. There is no chrome webstore limitation for apps merely wishing to use the Drive API.


Currently, no, you must create and install from the Chrome Web Store. Please note that you can publish your app to a private group of Trusted Testers which will prevent it from showing in the main listing (which would be bad during development).

We understand that this is a barrier to entry of using the API, and are looking at solutions.

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Yeah, that would be an appreciated next step! The Chrome Web Store requirement prevents a lot of great ideas! –  Markus Eisele May 4 '12 at 6:37
    
I just don't want to pay $5 to use an APP that I am developing for private use. I never plan to publicly publish what I am working on. SOLUTION: Free to publish for testing. –  zeel May 7 '12 at 6:49
    
I'm glad it isn't a $99 fee like many dev programs. You get an API and a ton of free storage. I actually like the idea that anyone can't just easily implement it outside of Chrome! –  Mischa Jun 14 '12 at 23:40
    
I'm having the same issue,.. is there any update on this? –  Rajeev M Aug 2 '12 at 9:49
    
"There is no chrome webstore limitation for apps merely wishing to use the Drive API." You still need to allow webstore apps in you're domain to get drive api applications working. (not 100% sure) –  DavidVdd Sep 6 '12 at 12:32

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